Walter X. Young I - History

Walter X. Young I  - History


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Walter X. Young I

Walter X. Young I

(APD-131: dp. 1,650; 1. 306'0"; b. 37'0"; dr. 12'7" s. 23.6 k.; cpl. 201; tr. 162; a. 1 5", 6 40mm., 6 20mm. cl. Crosley)

Walter X. Young (DE-715) was laid down on 27 May 1944 at Bay City, Mich., by the Defoe Shipbuilding Co.; reclassified a high-speed transport and redesignated APD-131 on 15 July 1944, launched on 30 September 1944, sponsored by Mrs. John J. McGeeney and commissioned on 1 May 1945, Lt. Comdr. Nicholas Biddle, USNR, in command.

After conducting shakedown in Guantanamo Bay, Walter X. Young interrupted her voyage to Norfolk when she transported an emergency appendectomy patient from LSM-406 to Guantanamo Bay for medical attention. Upon the completion of this mission of mercy, she arrived at Hampton Roads on 10 June. Post-shakedown availability and training exercises preceded her sailing south for Fort Pierce, Fla., for specialized training with underwater demolition teams (UDT). She departed the east coast on 30 July for San Pedro, Calif., transited the Panama Canal on 3 August, and while en route up the Pacific coast of Mexico, receive word of the atomic bomb detonation at Hiroshima on the 6th and, three days later, of a nuclear blast at Nagasaki, and of Russia's entry into the Pacific war the same day.

Two days after her arrival at San Diego on 12 August, further welcome news arrived, telling that Japan had accepted the unconditional surrender terms of the Potsdam Declaration and had capitulated. As a result of this development, Walter X. Young's original orders—calling for her embarked UDT personnel to take part in the projected invasion of Japan—were cancelled. Instead, the ship received a different mission.

On 16 August, Walter X. Young embarked the 93 men of UDT 22 (Lt. J. F. Chace, USNR, in command) and, after sunset on that date, sailed for the Hawaiian Islands. Arriving at Pearl Harbor on the morning of 22 August, she fueled and provisioned to capacity, loaded UDT explosives, and got underway on the afternoon of the 23d for Japan.

Her group steamed via the Marshall Islands, arrived in Tokyo Bay on 4 September, and reported to Vice Admiral Theodore S. "Ping" Wilkinson, Commander 3d Amphibious force. With the group now reconstituted as Task Group (TG) 32.2, as two further APD's and their embarked UDT's joined, they awaited their assignments. The dock areas at Yokohama—the scene for one of the major initial occupation landings—were found to be in good condition, suitable for immediate use. Thus, they did not require reconnoitering by the UDT's for possible mines or other obstructions. Midway through her stay in Tokyo Bay, Walter X. Young was buffeted about by a typhoon. With high winds and seas, she dragged her anchor and eventually shifted anchorage to the lee side of the bay. During the height of the tempest, the APD received word from Topeka (CL-67) that one of Walter X. Young's boats—an LCPR—which had been loaned to the cruiser, had broken away and been lost. When the storm cleared however, the "missing" craft was seen riding at a painter astern of the cruiser and later was recovered intact.

On the 20th, the ship's waiting period ended. In company with Gantner (APD- 42), Walter X. Young got underway on that date for Aomori, on the northern end of Honshu, to conduct a reconaissance and beach survey and to clear any obstacles that might impede Army landings. The two APD's escorted Catamount (LSD-17) on this short voyage. While en route on the 21st, the American warships sighted a floating mine and sank it with rifle fire. Upon arrival at Mutsu Kaiwan on the 22d, Gantner proceeded to Ominato to pick up local Japanese officials to assist in the clearance program. Meanwhile, Walter X. Young proceeded to Aomori, where, with the aid of underwater sounding devices, she located the hulks of three sunken ships. Swimmers from UDT 22 then attached buoys to them while a fourth wreck also located during the survey was found to have been already helpfully buoyed by the Japanese.

On the 23d, UDT 22 surveyed the beach and its approaches, as well as the available exits to the main highway which ran parallel to the beach itself, to the eastward of Aomori. They found nothing which required dynamiting but did attach buoys to some small wrecks at one end of the beach. They reported that the beach was suitable for all types of landing craft; was capable of supporting vehicles, and possessed several exits to the main road. Placing beach markers and drawing up maps of the area, Walter X. Young's UDT conducted an additional survey the following day, thus preparing the way for the landings at Aomori which followed on the 25th and continued throughout the day. Detached on the evening of the 25th, Walter X. Young reported to Commander, TG 32.2, for orders.

Anchoring at Ominato on the evening of the 26th, the ship obtained information concerning Japanese minefields still extant in Tsugaru Strait and the next day got underway for Niigata, on the west coast of Honshu. Proceeding independently, the ship rendezvoused with a Japanese tug—the Japanese craft carrying two American Army officers who had travelled overland from Tokyo, several Japanese police, and a local pilot—off the port. In an ensuing conference, it was learned that although the Japanese claimed to have swept a channel into Niigata, the width of the channel was too narrow to provide a margin of safety for an occupation force of transports. However, some 15 miles north ' of Niigata lay Senami. Walter X. Young's embarked UDT soon surveyed the beach and found it in excellent condition. Nevertheless, any landings should be conducted in calm weather or with a prevailing offshore wind due to the beach's exposed position on the Sea of Japan. Marking and mapping the beach, UDT 22 reembarked in Walter X. Young, and the ship got underway for Tokyo Bay, stopping at Hakodate, Hokkaido, en route, to pick up an officer from UDT 22 who had served a tour of detached duty there.

Walter X. Young dropped anchor at Yokohama on 30 September. On 12 October, she got underway for the west coast of the United States and steamed home-ward via Guam and Pearl Harbor. The ship arrived at San Diego on 2 November and immediately disembarked UDT 22. Ten days of availability at the Naval Repair Base, San Diego, preceded the ship's participation in coastwise transportation of Navy and Marine Corps dischargees within the 11th Naval District. The ship was decommissioned on 2 July 1946 and placed in reserve at Stockton, Calif.

Struck from the Navy list on 1 May 1962 and stripped of all militarily useful items and equipment, Walter X. Young was towed from her berth with the Stockton Reserve Group to her final duty station-the Naval Missile Center at Point Mugu, Calif. Subsequently converted to a test hulk, Walter X. Young was sunk in missile-firing tests on 11 April 1967.


WALTER SLEZAK, ACTOR, IS A SUICIDE AT 80 ON L.I.

Walter Slezak, the character actor whose roles ranged from menacing heavies in such movies as ''Lifeboat'' to endearing vagabonds as in the stage musical '⟺nny,'' for which he won a Tony award, committed suicide early yesterday at his home in Flower Hill, L.I. He was 80 years old.

Mr. Slezak shot himself with a .38-caliber revolver, according to the Nassau County Police. A family spokesman said the actor had become increasingly depressed over a series of illnesses, including a heart ailment.

The exuberantly impish actor with a bejowled, mustached face and a massive 6-foot frame delighted audiences in dozens of movies, a score of plays and scores of television appearances over half a century.

He was a matinee idol in German plays and movies in the 1920's, and in the 30's sparked such Broadway musicals as ''Music in the Air,'' ''May Wine'' and ''I Married an Angel.'' Many a Nazi Villain

In movies, he recurringly played Nazi villains. His most searing role was as a German submarine commander in Alfred Hitchcock's celebrated 1944 melodrama ''Lifeboat,'' in which he terrorizes Tallulah Bankhead and a knot of shipwreck survivors.

Mr. Slezak was alternately threatening and charming in such movies as ''This Land is Mine'' (1943), ''The Fallen Sparrow'' (1943), ''Till We Meet Again'' (1944), ''Salome, Where She Danced'' (1945), ''The Spanish Main'' (1945), ''The Pirate'' (1948), ''The Inspector General'' (1949) and '⟊ll Me Madam'' (1953).

He also appeared in the 1951 farce '𧯭time for Bonzo,'' which has stirred interest because of its star, Ronald Reagan. On Broadway, Mr. Slezak delighted Broadway audiences for a year and a half in the 1953 comedy ''My Three Angels,'' portraying a wily but sentimental embezzler and forger in a prison colony.

In 1954, he won more acclaim co-starring with Ezio Pinza in the sentimental musical '⟺nny,'' based on Marcel Pagnol's tale of life on the Marseilles waterfront. A Streak of Modesty

Mr. Slezak, who was noted for his winning brashness, could sometimes be modest. Of his performance in '⟺nny,'' he remarked: ''It says on the program I sing three songs. I really talk on pitch.''

His singing weakened as his weight sometimes soared to 280 pounds, but in 1957, he sang in the operetta ''The Gypsy Baron'' at New York's Metopolitan Opera House. The event marked a personal triumph because his father, Leo Slezak, the celebrated leading tenor of the Vienna Opera, had wanted him to be an opera singer.

The son wrote about his father and other prominent figures in a 1962 book of reminiscences, ''What Time's the Next Swan?'' Hailing the sketches as 'ɻuoyant and bubbling,'' Bosley Crowther, film critic of The New York Times, offered this tribute: ''The same gaiety and enthusiasm, sensitivity and sentimentality that has distinguished each performance of Walter Slezak since he first achieved stage prominence as an apple-cheeked lad in lederhosen in ''Music in the Air'' decorates his first achievement as an author.''

Mr. Slezak was born in Vienna on May 3, 1902. He began to study medicine but gave it up and went to work in a bank. In 1922, at the age of 20, while carousing in a beer garden, he was spotted by director Michael Curtiz and offered a film role. He accepted, and soon he was playing romantic leads on the stage and in German films. But his penchant for gaining weight forced him into character roles. In 1930, he won a part on Broadway in an operetta titled ''Meet My Sister.'' His reception by reviewers and audiences guaranteed him leading roles in major musicals and dramas. ɺw, Let It Spread'

Discussing his corpulence, Mr. Slezak offered this appraisal: ''In 1939 I gave up trying to be a juvenile. When I think of what leading men go through trying to look young and slim! I just said to myself, ɺw, let it spread.' I got obese, married, fat and prosperous, in that order. I started playing nasty roles. With them my disposition changed. I got fat and amiable.''

Besides being a brilliant entertainer, Mr. Slezak was a linguist, a devotee of painting and chess and a lover of good books, food and hunting. For many years he piloted his own plane.

Surviving are his wife, the former Johanna van Rijn two daughters, Ingrid and Erika, a longtime star of the television soap opera ''One Life to Live'' and the wife of Brian Davies, also an actor a son, Leo, and four grandchildren.


Personality [ edit | edit source ]

In his youth, he appeared to be belligerent, short tempered, foul-mouthed, arrogant, and almost sadistic in his love of battle, as seen when insulting and mocking The Major and gleefully slicing up the Millennium soldiers. He would loudly brag and regularly insult his opponents. He was greatly annoyed by The Major's lack of fear of him after seeing him easily kill several soldiers.

As an elderly man, Walter serves primarily as Integra's butler and also makes special weapons for use by vampires, Alucard and Seras Victoria. In his old age, he has become the perfect model of an English butler polite, diligent, brooding, dutiful, and intelligent with a dry, ironic sense of humor and a merciless disposition toward the enemies of his master. He appears to have mellowed out a great deal externally, cutting apart his enemies with a cold precision rather than with the glee of his younger self, and delivering only ironic and dignified insults instead of simply swearing up a storm.

During his earlier years working under Arthur, it seems as though he formed an alliance with Millennium, despite saying in The Dawn that he would never join with them.

He appears to take great pride in being human, to the point of saying in response to Alucard's depreciation of old age that "If we cannot have our prosperity with pride, we should reject such prosperity.", but this too would be revealed to be just a part of his act. After the doctor rejuvenates him, he even states how beautiful his new body was at the same time he steps on the remains of Alexander Anderson, saying that people become trash once they are dead, and that trash should not be mourned for, showing that he views humanity and mortality to be weak, and all his sentiment to the contrary were likely part of his ploy to remain above suspicion.

Despite his secret disgust for human beings, he does have a large amount of care and affection for Integra and Seras, as he views them as the only thing close to real family he has. This has been shown on many occasions, such as when Seras thanks him for everything he's done for her, and being the only one to show hospitality to her when she first came to manor - and this actually made him break his own true character for a brief moment to show that he truly appreciates her gratitude. When Alucard mockingly reminded him that, because of his betrayal, he has lost Integra and Seras forever and that now their love and company belongs to only Alucard alone forever, this causes Walter to become incredibly furious. On his death bed, he smiles and thinks of Integra, and how they've come so far together, and though despite that his plan failed, he still dies happy because of her.

Alucard and Walter are the only real friends each other have, to the point where Alucard has called them "blood brothers" due to their companionship and the incomprehensible amount of people they've killed together over the decades.

Despite his ruthless betrayal of Integra and the rest of Hellsing to Millenium, Walter did have a degree of disgust for the experiments of the Doctor. His revulsion at the experiments on Mina Harker's corpse, referring to them as unspeakable, shows a degree of respect for the remains of the dead and an utter contempt for the very scientist who gave him the strength to defeat Alucard.


Young History, Family Crest & Coats of Arms

The name Young has a history dating as far back as the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain. It was a name for a person who was very young, from the Old English word yong and yung and was first bestowed on the younger of two bearers of the same personal name, usually a son who was named for his father.

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Early Origins of the Young family

The surname Young was first found in Essex, where the first record of the name appears in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as Wilfer seo lunga in 744. Many years later Walter Yonge was listed in the Subsidy Rolls for Sussex in 1296. [1]

Another reference lists Hugh le Yunge in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 as residing in Oxfordshire. The same rolls list Ralph le Younge in Staffordshire and later William le Yunge in Northumberland during the reign of Edward I. [2]

Down in Devon, Honiton was "for a long period it was very much of a family borough. Members of the Yonge family sat almost continuously from 1640 to 1796." [3]

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Early History of the Young family

This web page shows only a small excerpt of our Young research. Another 117 words (8 lines of text) covering the years 1271, 1400, 1500, 1423, 1407, 1437, 1423, 1425, 1405, 1476, 1405, 1426, 1411, 1413, 1414, 1455, 1466, 1467, 1516, 1467, 1463, 1526, 1579, 1649, 1603, 1663, 1642, 1660, 1646, 1721, 1860, 1868 and are included under the topic Early Young History in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

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Young Spelling Variations

Spelling variations in names were a common occurrence before English spelling was standardized a few hundred years ago. In the Middle Ages, even the literate spelled their names differently as the English language incorporated elements of French, Latin, and other European languages. Many variations of the name Young have been found, including Young, Younge, Yonge, Youngson and others.

Early Notables of the Young family (pre 1700)

Distinguished members of the family include James Yonge ( fl. 1423), English translator who belonged to an English family settled in the Irish pale. William Yonge, Archdeacon of Meath from 1407 to 1437, was possibly his brother. "James Yonge was in prison in Trim Castle from January to October 1423, being removed in the latter month to Dublin Castle, and being pardoned on 10 May 1425. A John Yonge was serjeant of the county of Limerick in the reign of Richard II, held a lease of various lands, and was convicted of unspecified felonies. " [4] Thomas Yonge (1405?-1476), was an English judge.
Another 135 words (10 lines of text) are included under the topic Early Young Notables in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Migration of the Young family to Ireland

Some of the Young family moved to Ireland, but this topic is not covered in this excerpt.
Another 121 words (9 lines of text) about their life in Ireland is included in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.

Young migration +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Young Settlers in United States in the 17th Century
  • Richard Young and his wife, who settled in Virginia in 1623
  • Joseph and Margaret Young, who immigrated to New England with their two sons in 1635
  • Harford Young, aged 20, who arrived in Barbados in 1635 [5]
  • Marmaduke Young, aged 24, who arrived in Virginia in 1635 [5]
  • Martha Young, who landed in Bermuda in 1635 [5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Young Settlers in United States in the 18th Century
  • Nicho Young, who landed in Virginia in 1701 [5]
  • Eliz Young, who landed in Virginia in 1704 [5]
  • Alex Young, who arrived in Virginia in 1706 [5]
  • Anne Young, who arrived in Virginia in 1714 [5]
  • Tebald Young, who landed in New York in 1715-1716 [5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Young Settlers in United States in the 19th Century
  • John Tatem Young, who arrived in Charleston, South Carolina in 1802 [5]
  • Robert Young, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) County, Pennsylvania in 1802 [5]
  • Noble Young, aged 22, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1804 [5]
  • Sarah Young, aged 50, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1804 [5]
  • James Young, aged 21, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1804 [5]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Young migration to Canada +

Some of the first settlers of this family name were:

Young Settlers in Canada in the 18th Century
  • George Young, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Andreas Young, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749-1752
  • John Young, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • Robert Young, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • William Young, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Young Settlers in Canada in the 19th Century
  • David Young, who arrived in Quebec in 1821
  • John Young, who arrived in Canada in 1821
  • Dorah Young, aged 15, who arrived in Canada in 1823
  • Harriet Young, aged 3, who landed in Canada in 1823
  • John Young, aged 41, who landed in Canada in 1823
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
Young Settlers in Canada in the 20th Century

Young migration to Australia +

Emigration to Australia followed the First Fleets of convicts, tradespeople and early settlers. Early immigrants include:

Young Settlers in Australia in the 19th Century
  • Mr. Benjamin Young, English convict who was convicted in Lindsey (Parts of Lindsey), Lincolnshire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Asiatic" on 5th June 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[6]
  • Mr. George Young, English convict who was convicted in Peterborough, Cambridgeshire, England for life, transported aboard the "Canada" on 23rd April 1819, arriving in New South Wales, Australia[7]
  • Mr. Thomas Young, British Convict who was convicted in Worcester, Worcestershire, England for 7 years, transported aboard the "Caledonia" on 5th July 1820, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [8]
  • Mr. William Young, Scottish convict who was convicted in Glasgow, Scotland for 7 years, transported aboard the "Caledonia" on 5th July 1820, arriving in Tasmania ( Van Diemen's Land) [8]
  • Thomas Young, English convict from Lincoln, who was transported aboard the "Agamemnon" on April 22, 1820, settling in New South Wales, Australia[9]
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Young migration to New Zealand +

Emigration to New Zealand followed in the footsteps of the European explorers, such as Captain Cook (1769-70): first came sealers, whalers, missionaries, and traders. By 1838, the British New Zealand Company had begun buying land from the Maori tribes, and selling it to settlers, and, after the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840, many British families set out on the arduous six month journey from Britain to Aotearoa to start a new life. Early immigrants include:

Young Settlers in New Zealand in the 18th Century
Young Settlers in New Zealand in the 19th Century
  • George Young, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1830
  • William Young, who landed in Bay of Islands, New Zealand in 1836
  • Arthur Young, who landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1841 aboard the ship Lady Nugent
  • Edward Young, aged 31, a turner, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1841
  • Caroline Mary Young, aged 27, who arrived in Port Nicholson aboard the ship "Gertrude" in 1841
  • . (More are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Contemporary Notables of the name Young (post 1700) +

  • Paul Antony Young (b. 1956), English singer, songwriter and musician he received the award for Best British Male at the 1985 Brit Awards
  • Sir Leslie Ronald "Jimmy" Young CBE (1921-2016), English singer and radio personality
  • Clive Young (1948-2015), English clergyman, Bishop of Dunwich (1999-2013)
  • George Malcolm Young (1882-1959), English historical essayist
  • David Ivor Young (b. 1932), English politician
  • Michael Young (b. 1915), English Baronof Dartington, a pioneer in the development of "distance learning" in the Third World and within Britain
  • John Sacret Young (1946-2021), American author, producer, director, and screenwriter primarily in television, perhaps best known for his work on the show China Beach, nominated for seven Emmys and seven Writers Guild of America Awards
  • Leslie Galen Young (1975-2021), American professional basketball player
  • Jerome Young (1963-2021), American professional wrestler, better known by his ring name New Jack
  • Rory Young (1967-2021), Irish conservationist, president and co-founder of the anti-poaching organisation Chengeta Wildlife that is active all over Africa
  • . (Another 68 notables are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)

Historic Events for the Young family +

Halifax Explosion
  • Mr. Rufus Charles  Young (1849-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [10]
  • Mr. Archibald W  Young (1852-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who survived the explosion but later died due to injuries [10]
  • Mr. Richard  Young (1861-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [10]
  • Mr. Elmer  Young (1912-1917), Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [10]
  • Mr. Arthur Henry  Young, Canadian resident from Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada who died in the explosion [10]
  • . (Another 5 entries are available in all our PDF Extended History products and printed products wherever possible.)
HMAS Sydney II
  • Mr. John Robinson Young (1920-1941), Australian Able Seaman from Townsville, Queensland, Australia, who sailed into battle aboard HMAS Sydney II and died in the sinking [11]
HMS Dorsetshire
  • Archie Jarvis Young, British Chief Petty Officer aboard the HMS Dorsetshire when she was struck by air bombers and sunk he survived the sinking [12]
HMS Hood
  • Mr. Percy A Young (b. 1924), Canadian Boy Bugler serving for the Royal Marine from Alberta, Canada, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [13]
  • Mr. John O Young (b. 1919), English Signalman serving for the Royal Navy from Manor Park, London, England, who sailed into battle and died in the sinking [13]
HMS Prince of Wales
  • Mr. Norman Young, British Ordinary Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and survived the sinking [14]
  • Mr. William George Young (b. 1904), "Bill" English Able Seaman from England, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. Robert Emmanuel Young (b. 1924), English Boy 1st Class from England, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [14]
  • Mr. James Young (b. 1924), English Boy 1st Class from England, who sailed into battle on the HMS Prince of Wales and died in the sinking [14]
HMS Repulse
  • Mr. Francis Sydney Young, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and died in the sinking [15]
  • Mr. David Mcgill Young, British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Oswald Littlewood Young (1920-1942), British Able Bodied Seaman, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking, vwas listed as missing presumed killed in the evacuation of Singapore in 1942 [15]
  • Mr. R D Young, British Leading Air Mechanician, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking [15]
  • Mr. Robert Alexander Victor Young, British Marine, who sailed into battle on the HMS Repulse and survived the sinking, died during the evacuation of Singapore in 1942 [15]
RMS Lusitania
  • Mrs. Elizabeth Young, Scottish 3rd Class passenger residing in Chicago, Illinois, USA visiting Scotland, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [16]
  • Mrs. Georgina Ann Young, Canadian 1st Class Passenger from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [16]
  • Mr. James Mason Young, Canadian 1st Class Passenger from Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, who sailed aboard the RMS Lusitania and died in the sinking [16]
RMS Titanic
  • Mr. Francis J. Young (d. 1912), aged 30, English Trimmer from Southampton, Hampshire who worked aboard the RMS Titanic and died in the sinking [17]
  • Miss Marie Grice Young, aged 36, American First Class passenger from New York City, New York who sailed aboard the RMS Titanic and survived the sinking escaping in life boat 8 [17]
USS Arizona
  • Mr. Donald G. Young, American Private First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he survived the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Glendale Rex Young, American Seaman First Class working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Jay Wesley Young, American Seaman First Class from Utah, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Vivan Louis Young, American Water Tender First Class from Virginia, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [18]
  • Mr. Eric Reed Young, American Ensign from Colorado, USA working aboard the ship "USS Arizona" when she sunk during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7th December 1941, he died in the sinking [18]

Related Stories +

The Young Motto +

The motto was originally a war cry or slogan. Mottoes first began to be shown with arms in the 14th and 15th centuries, but were not in general use until the 17th century. Thus the oldest coats of arms generally do not include a motto. Mottoes seldom form part of the grant of arms: Under most heraldic authorities, a motto is an optional component of the coat of arms, and can be added to or changed at will many families have chosen not to display a motto.

Motto: Toujours jeune
Motto Translation: Always young.


Walter X. Young I - History

Ragman by Walter Wangerin, Jr.

I saw a strange sight. I stumbled upon a story most strange, like nothing in my life, my street sense, my sly tongue had ever prepared me for. Hush, child. hush now, and I will tell it to you.

Even before the dawn one Friday morning I noticed a young man, handsome and strong, walking the alleys of our City. He was pulling an old cart filled with clothes both bright and new, and he was calling in a clear tenor voice: 'Rags!' Ah, the air was foul and the first light filthy to be crossed by such sweet music.

'Rags! New rags for old! I take your tired rags! Rags!'

'Now this is a wonder,' I thought to myself, for the man stood six-feet-four, and his arms were like tree limbs, hard and muscular, and his eyes flashed intelligence. Could he find no better job than this, to be a ragman in the inner city?

I followed him. My curiosity drove me. And I wasn't disappointed.

Soon the ragman saw a woman sitting on her back porch. She was sobbing into a handkerchief, signing, and shedding a thousand tears. Her knees and elbows made a sad X. Her shoulders shook. Her heart was breaking.

The Ragman stopped his cart. Quietly, he walked to the woman, stepping round tin cans, dead toys, and Pampers.

'Give me your rag,' he said gently. 'and I'll give you another.'

He slipped the handkerchief from her eyes. She looked up, and he laid across her palm a linen cloth so clean and new that it shined. She blinked from the gift to the giver.

Then, as he began to pull his cart again, the Ragman did a strange thing: he put her stained handkerchief to his own face and then he began to weep, to sob as grievously as she had done, his shoulders shaking. Yet she was left without a tear.

'This is a wonder,' I breathed to myself, and I followed the sobbing Ragman like a child who cannot turn away from mystery.

'Rags! Rags! New Rags for old!"

In a little while, when the sky showed grey behind the rooftops and I could see the shredded curtains hanging out black windows, the Ragman came upon a girl whose head was wrapped in a bandage, whose eyes were empty. Blood soaked her bandage. A single line of blood ran down her cheek.

Now the tall Ragman looked upon this child with pity, and he drew a lovely yellow bonnet from his cart.

'Give me your rag,' he said, tracing his own line on her cheek, 'and I'll give you mine.'

The child could only gaze at him while he loosened the bandage, removed it, and tied it to his own head. The bonnet he set on hers. And I gasped at what I saw: for with the bandage went the wound! Against his brow it ran a darker, more substantial blood -- his own!

'Rags! Rags! I take old rags!' cried the sobbing, bleeding, strong, intelligent Ragman.

The sun hurt both the sky, now, and my eyes the Ragman seemed more and more to hurry.

'Are you going to work?' he asked a man who leaned against a telephone pole. The man shook his head. The Ragman pressed him: 'Do you have a job?"

'Are you crazy?' sneered the other. He pulled away from the pole, revealing the right sleeve of his jacket -- flat, the cuff stuffed into the pocket. He had no arm.

'So,' said the Ragman. 'Give me your jacket, and I'll give you mine.'

So much quiet authority in his voice!

The one-armed man took off his jacket. So did the Ragman -- and I trembled at what I saw: for the Ragman's arm stayed in its sleeve, and when the other put it on, he had two good arms, thick as tree limbs but the Ragman had only one.

After that he found a drunk, lying unconscious beneath an army blanket, an old man, hunched, wizened, and sick. He took that blanket and wrapped it round himself, but for the drunk he left new clothes.

And now I had to run to keep up with the Ragman. Though he was weeping uncontrollably, and bleeding freely at the forehead, pulling his cart with one arm, stumbling for drunkenness, falling again and again, exhausted, old, old, and sick, yet he went with terrible speed. On spider's legs he skittered through the alleys of the City, this mile and the next, until he came to its limits, and then he rushed beyond.

I wept to see the change in this man. I hurt to see his sorrow. And yet I need to see where he was going in such haste, perhaps to know what drove him so.

The little old Ragman -- he came to a landfill. He came to the garbage pits. And I waited to help him in what he did but I hung back, hiding. He climbed a hill. With tormented labor he cleared a little space on that hill. Then he signed. He lay down. He pillowed his head on a handkerchief and a jacket. He covered his bones with an army blanket. And he died.

Oh how I cried to witness that death! I slumped in a junked car and wailed and mourned as one who has no hope -- because I had come to love the Ragman. Every other face had faded in the wonder of this man, and I cherished him but he died. I sobbed myself to sleep.

I did not know -- how could I know? -- that I slept through Friday night and Saturday and its night too.

But then, on Sunday morning, I was wakened by a violence.

Light -- pure, hard, demanding light -- slammed against my sour face, and I blinked, and I looked, and I saw the first wonder of all. There was the Ragman, folding the blanket most carefully, a scar on his forehead, but alive! And, besides that, healthy! There was no sign of sorrow or age, and all the rags that he had gathered shined for cleanliness.

Well, then I lowered my head and, trembling for all that I had seen, I myself walked up to the Ragman. I told him my name with shame, for I was a sorry figure next to him. Then I took off all my clothes in that place, and I said to him with dear yearning in my voice: 'Dress me."

He dressed me. My Lord, he put new rags on me, and I am a wonder beside him. The Ragman, the Ragman, the Christ!


In 1986, an 18-year-old white woman named Ronda Morrison was murdered in downtown Monroeville, Alabama. The crime sent shock waves of fear and anger through the small community. Police could not solve the crime. After six months with no leads or suspects, their attention focused on Walter McMillian. Mr. McMillian was an unlikely suspect. He had no prior criminal history and was a 45-year-old self-employed logger who had done work for many people throughout the community. What seemed to bring him attention is that he’d had an affair with a married white woman. A very public divorce between this woman and her husband pulled Mr. McMillian into the limelight and he soon went from someone having an interracial affair to someone thought to be capable of murder.

A white man accused of crimes in another county was pressured by police and ultimately made false statements accusing Mr. McMillian of murdering Ms. Morrison. This set off a chain of events that changed Mr. McMillian’s life forever. He was arrested by Monroe County Sheriff Tom Tate and eventually charged with capital murder. The sheriff arranged for Mr. McMillian to be placed on death row before his trial—when he hadn’t even been convicted of a crime. Known to his friends and family as “Johnny D,” Mr. McMillian spent 15 harrowing and tortuous months on Alabama’s death row before trial.

Mr. McMillian was with his family 11 miles away from the dry cleaning store where Ms. Morrison was murdered at the time of the crime. There were dozens of Black people who could testify to his innocence but they were ignored. The nearly all-white jury convicted Mr. McMillian of capital murder and sentenced him to life imprisonment without parole.

In Alabama, elected trial judges were authorized to override a jury’s life verdict and impose the death penalty. Judge Robert E. Lee Key overrode the jury’s sentence of life imprisonment and sentenced Mr. McMillian to death by electrocution. Mr. McMillian was sent back to his cell on death row, where he ultimately spent six years.


Later Life and Death

Raleigh’s aggressive actions toward the Spanish did not sit well with the pacifist King James I, Elizabeth&aposs successor. Raleigh’s enemies worked to taint his reputation with the new king and he was soon charged with treason and condemned to death. However, the sentence was commuted to imprisonment in the Tower in 1603. There Raleigh lived with his wife and servants and wrote his History of the World in 1614. He was released in 1616 to search for gold in South America. Against the king&aposs approval, he invaded and pillaged Spanish territory, was forced to return to England without booty and was arrested on the orders of the king. His original death sentence for treason was invoked, and he was executed at Westminster.


Class of 2020 Career Outcomes Available + A Survey for Spring 󈧙 Graduates

Data on the Class of 2020 are now available on the Walter Center’s Career Outcomes Dashboard. This page illustrates the success students experience in the months following their graduation from the College of Arts + Sciences at Indiana University.

Now Hiring: Rock Paper Scissors Inc. is hiring a publicist

Rock Paper Scissors Inc. gets influential people to talk about music tech companies so they can generate leads, make sales, do deals, and attract investment. They devise PR campaigns using out-of-this-world creativity to get high-level media coverage.

About the Organization:

Volunteering Helped Jamie Baca-Perez Intern with the Monroe County Humane Association

In the summer of 2019, Jamie Baca-Perez felt discouraged. She wasn’t able to secure a job where she could work with animals, and that meant she couldn’t stay in Bloomington during the summer months.


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We are excited to offer this superb 2014 Toyota AYGO x-clusiv with only 46,000 miles.

To book a test drive or request further information on this or any other vehicle we have in stock, please do not hesitate to reach out to our friendly team.

Walter Young Limited

We are excited to offer this superb 2014 Mazda Mazda6 SE-L 2.2TD with only 92,000 miles.

For further information on this or any other vehicle we have in stock, please do not hesitate to reach out to our friendly team.

Walter Young Limited

We are excited to offer this superb 2017 Mazda Mazda2 SE-L 1.5 with only 46,000 miles.

For further information on this or any other vehicle we have in stock, please do not hesitate to reach out to our friendly team.

Walter Young Limited

We are excited to offer this superb 2015 Mazda Mazda2 Sport Launch Edition 1.5 with only 21,000 miles.

For further information on this or any other vehicle we have in stock, please do not hesitate to reach out to our friendly team.


All about our 2019 winners

The nine winners of our 2019 competition were awarded in our special virtual Awards Event on 16th June 2020 (video below). First prize in the 11-15 years category went to Ide Crawford (14), from Macclesfield, for her story The Whale’s Way, and in the 16-19 years category the winner was Charlotte Lee (19), from Crewe, with her story The Best Thing. Seven other young writers were commended by the judges. To find out all about last year’s winners, go to our news page. Their stories are now available as a printed Anthology – please use the email form on our contact us page to request your free copy.


Watch the video: Student accused of threatening to shoot up Walter C. Young Middle School


Comments:

  1. Shakakinos

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  2. Shale

    It is also possible on this issue, because only in a dispute can the truth be achieved. :)

  3. Tara

    A very valuable answer



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