Charles S Perry DD- 697 - History

Charles S Perry DD- 697 - History


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Charles S. Sperry

Charles Stillman Sperry, born in Brooklyn, N.Y., 3 September 1847, graduated from the Naval Academy in 1886. In November 1898 he became commanding officer of Yorktown, and later served as senior officer of the Southern Squadron on the Asiatic Station and as President of the Naval War College. As a rear admiral, he I served in the United States delegation to the Geneva Convention and the Second Hague Conference, and as Commander in Chief, Battle Fleet, he led the Great White Fleet during the major portion of its historic cruise around the world in 1907 and 1908. Admiral Sperry retired 3 September 1909, but subsequently was recalled to active duty for special service, He died 1 February 1911 in Washington, D.C.

(DD-697: dp. 2,200, 1. 376'6", b. 40'; dr. 15'8"; s. 34 k.;
cpl. 336; a. 6 5", 10 21" tt., 6 dcp., 2 dct.; cl. Allen M.
Sumner)

Charles S. Sperry (DD-697) was launched 13 March 1944 by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Co., Kearny, N.J.; sponsored by Miss M. Sperry; commissioned 17 May 1944, Commander H. H. McIlhenny in command; and reported to the Pacific Fleet. After training in the Hawaiian Islands, Charles S. Sperry arrived at Ulithi 28 December 1944 to join the fast carrier force, TF 38.. For the remainder of the war she sailed in the screen of the third group of this mighty force, variously designated TF 38 and TF 58. She sortied with her group for the first time on 30 December, bound for the areas from which the carriers launched strikes against Japanese bases on Formosa and Luzon in preparation for the assault on Lingayen Gulf beaches. Continuing to neutralize Japanese airfields the force moved on to strike at targets in Indochina, on the South China coast, and on Okinawa before returning to Ulithi 26 January 1945.

Charles S. Sperry sailed with TF 58 once more on 10 February 1945, as the force began its familiar work in preparation for the invasion of Iwo Jima. An audacious raid against Tokyo itself was first on the schedule, the first carrier strikes on the heart of Japan since the Doolittle Raid: On 16 and 17 February, planes from the carriers guarded by Charles S. Sperry roared over Tokyo, in attacks which inflicted substantial material damage, and great moral damage, to the Japanese war effort. Now Charles S. Sperry's force offered direct support during the assault landings at Iwo Jima. Twice, on 19 February and on 20-21 February, the carrier force came under air attack from the enemy, but antiaircraft fire from Charles S. Sperry and the other screening ships, combined with evasive maneuvering and a protective smoke screen, prevented damage to the great concentration of ships. A final round of air strikes was hurled at Tokyo and Okinawa before TF 58 returned to Ulithi 5 March. Once more designated TF 38, the force cleared Ulithi 14 March 1945 for the Okinawa operation, which would keep Charles S. Sperry and many other ships at sea almost continuously until 1 June. First came air strikes against Kyushu, for which the Japanese retaliated with heavy air attacks against the carrier force on 19 and 20 March. While carrier Franklin (CV-13) was badly damaged in these attacks, Charles S. Sperry and other escorts furnished effective antiaircraft fire which prevented further harm to the force, and she shared in splashing several Japanese planes.

Charles S. Sperry turned south with her force for strikes against Okinawa. The destroyer joined in a bombardment of the Japanese airstrip on tiny but critically located Minami Daito Shima 27 March. Close air support was provided by TF 38 as the invasion began on 1 April 1945, and Charles S. Sperry served as plane guard and radar picket for her force. On 7 April planes from the carriers she screened joined in sending the powerful battleship Yamoto, her accompanying cruiser, and four of eight guardian destroyers to the bottom. Charles S. Sperry herself fired often, aiding in splashing planes of the kamikaze strikes hurled at her force on 11, 14, 16, and 29 April, and 11 May. When carriers Hancock (CV-19) and Bunker Hill (CV-17) fell victim to the suicide planes, Charles S. Sperry stood by them, aiding in damage control, and rescuing men from the water.

The destroyer remained in San Pedro Bay, P.I., from l June to 1 July, and then sailed to support the carriers as they launched the final air strikes at the Japanese home islands. Cover for the first occupation landing and the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Japanese prison camps was flown by the carriers, and on 81 August, the great force arrived off Tokyo Bay for the surrender ceremonies held on 2 September.

Charles S. Sperry remained in the Far East, taking part in exercises, on patrol, and carrying mail, until 30 December 1945, when she departed Sasebo for the east coast, arriving at Baltimore 19 February 1946. For the next year, she remained at Boston with a reduced crew, and in March 1947, reported at New Orleans for duty as a training ship for members of the Naval Reserve until July 1960. After overhaul at Norfolk, she sailed for the Far East, arriving off embattled Korea 14 October 1960.
The destroyer operated almost continuously off Korea until June 1951. For her first 2 weeks in action, she fired on shore installations at SongJin, screened shipping, and patrolled areas swept of mines to guard against their remaining During November and December 1950 she continued her fire support and bombardments, covered the redeployments from Kojo, Wonsan, and Hungnam, and screened salvage operations. On 23 December, while firing at Songjin, she was hit by three shells returned by an enemy shore battery, but suffered no casualties, and only minor damage, which was repaired at Sasebo early in January 1951. She returned to the Korean firing line to cover salvage operations north of the 38th parallel and conduct bombardments along the coast.

As operations leading to the classic blockade of Wonsan began, Charles S. Sperry entered the dangerous harbor 17 January 1951 to provide interdiction fire, and to cover the landings which secured the harbor islands. She cleared the Wonsan area 5 March for Songjin, where she joined in setting the siege, and until 6 June was almost constantly patrolling and firing on shore installations at Songjin. She then sailed for home, arriving at Norfolk 2 July.
Taking up the operating schedule of the Destroyer Force, Atlantic, Charles S. Sperry sailed from Norfolk through 1960. In 1953, 1955, 1956, 1958, and 1959 she cruised in the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. During her 1956 deployment, which coincided with the Suez Crisis, she escorted the transports which evacuated American nationals from Egypt. Midshipmen cruises and North Atlantic Treaty Organization exercises took her to northern European ports on several occasions some of them in coordination with her Mediterranean deployments.

Late in 1959 Charles S. Sperry began an extensive overhaul for rehabilitation and modernization, which continued through 1960.

Charles S. Sperry received four battle stars for World War II service and four for the Korean War.


USS Charles S. Sperry (DD 697)

Decommisioned at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard and stricken 15 December 1973.
Transferred to Chile 8 January 1974 being renamed Ministro Zenteno.
Ministro Zenteno was stricken and scrapped in 1990.

Commands listed for USS Charles S. Sperry (DD 697)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Lt.Cdr. Harry Haywood McIlhenny, USN17 May 194413 Apr 1945 ( 1 )
2T/Cdr. John Benjamin Morland, USN13 Apr 1945Aug 1946 ( 1 )
3Lcmdr William Stanton Hitchins, USNRAug 1946Oct 1948 ( 1 )
4T/Cdr. Alexander Bacon Coxe, Jr., USNOct 1948Mar 1950 ( 1 )

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Notable events involving Charles S. Sperry include:

28 Dec 1944
USS Charles S. Sperry arrived at Ulithi.

30 Dec 1944
USS Charles S. Sperry departed from Ulithi with TF 38.

26 Jan 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry returns to Ulithi.

10 Feb 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry departed from Ulithi with TF 58.

5 Mar 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry returns once more to Ulithi.

14 Mar 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry departed from Ulithi with TF 38 to support the Okinawa landings.

1 Jun 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry arrived at San Pedro Bay, Philippines.

1 Jul 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry departed from San Pedro Bay, Philippines to re-join to fleet for operations of Japan.

31 Aug 1945
USS Charles S. Sperry puts into Tokyo Bay.

Media links


Charles S Perry DD- 697 - History

Charles Stillman Sperry, born in Brooklyn, NY, 3 September 1847, graduated from the Naval Academy in 1866. In November 1898 he became commanding officer of Yorktown, and later served as senior officer of the Southern Squadron on the Asiatic Station and as President of the Naval War College. As a rear admiral, he served in the United States delegation to the Geneva Convention and the Second Hague Conference, and as Commander in Chief, Battle Fleet, he led the Great White Fleet during the major portion of its historic cruise around the world in 1907 and 1908. Admiral Sperry retired 3 September 1909, but subsequently was recalled to active duty for special service. He died 1 February 1911 in Washington, D.C.


CLASS - ALLEN M. SUMNER As Built.
Displacement 3218 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 376' 6"(oa) x 40' 10" x 14' 2" (Max)
Armament 6 x 5"/38AA (3x2), 12 x 40mm AA, 11 x 20mm AA, 10 x 21" tt.(2x5).
Machinery, 60,000 SHP Westinghouse Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 36.5 Knots, Range 3300 [email protected] 20 Knots, Crew 336.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Federal Shipbuilding, Kearny NJ. October 19 1943.
Launched March 13 1944 and commissioned May 17 1944.
Completed FRAM upgrade June 1960.
Decommissioned December 15 1973.
Stricken December 15 1973.
To Chile January 8 1974, renamed Ministro Zenteno.
Fate Stricken and scrapped in 1990.


Contents

United States Navy [ edit | edit source ]

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

After training in the Hawaiian Islands, Charles S. Sperry arrived at Ulithi 28 December 1944 to join the fast carrier force, TP 38. For the remainder of the war, she sailed in the screen of the third group of this mighty force, variously designated TF 38 and TF 58. She sortied with her group for the first time on 30 December, bound for the areas from which the carriers launched strikes against Japanese bases on Formosa and Luzon in preparation for the assault on Lingayen Gulf beaches. Continuing to neutralize Japanese airfields the force moved on to strike at targets in Indochina, on the South China coast, and on Okinawa before returning to Ulithi 26 January 1945.

Sperry sailed with TF 58 once more on 10 February 1945, as the force began its familiar work in preparation for the invasion of Iwo Jima. An audacious raid against Tokyo itself was first on the schedule, the first carrier strikes on the heart of Japan since the Doolittle Raid. On 16 and 17 February, planes from the carriers guarded by Sperry roared over Tokyo, in attacks which inflicted substantial material damage, and great moral damage, to the Japanese war effort. Sperry forces offered direct support during the assault landings at Iwo Jima. Twice, on 19 February and on 20–21 February, the carrier force came under air attack from the enemy, but antiaircraft fire from Sperry and the other screening ships, combined with evasive maneuvering and a protective smoke screen, prevented damage to the great concentration of ships. A final round of air strikes was hurled at Tokyo and Okinawa before TF 58 returned to Ulithi 5 March.

Once more designated TF 38, the force cleared Ulithi 14 March 1945 for the Okinawa operation, which would keep Sperry and many other ships at sea almost continuously until 1 June. First came air strikes against Kyushu, for which the Japanese retaliated with heavy air attacks against the carrier force on 19 and 20 March. While Franklin was badly damaged in these attacks, Sperry and other escorts furnished effective antiaircraft fire which pre vented further harm to the force, and she shared in splashing several Japanese planes.

USS Charles S. Sperry alongside USS Bunker Hill, 11 May 1945.

Sperry turned south with her force for strikes against Okinawa. The destroyer joined in a bombardment of the Japanese airstrip on tiny but critically located Minami Daito Shima 27 March. Close air support was provided by TF 38 as the invasion began on 1 April 1945, and Sperry served as plane guard and radar picket for her force. On 7 April, planes from the carriers she screened joined in sending Yamato, her accompanying cruiser, and four of eight guardian destroyers to the bottom. Sperry herself fired often, aiding in splashing planes of the kamikaze strikes hurled at her force on 11, 14, 16, and 29 April, and 11 May. When Hancock and Bunker Hill fell victim to kamikazes, Sperry stood by them, aiding in damage control, and rescuing men from the water.

The destroyer remained in San Pedro Bay, Philippines, from 1 June to 1 July, and then sailed to support the carriers as they launched the final air strikes at the Japanese home islands. Cover for the first occupation landings and the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Japanese prison camps was flown by the carriers, and on 31 August, the great force arrived off Tokyo Bay for the surrender ceremonies held on 2 September.

Post-World War II [ edit | edit source ]

Sperry remained in the Far East, taking part in exercises, on patrol, and carrying mail, until 30 December 1945, when she departed Sasebo for the east coast, arriving at Baltimore 19 February 1946. For the next year, she remained at Boston with a reduced crew, and in March 1947, reported at New Orleans for duty as a training ship for members of the Naval Reserve until July 1950. After overhaul at Norfolk, she sailed for the Far East, arriving off embattled Korea 14 October 1950.

Korean War [ edit | edit source ]

The destroyer operated almost continuously off Korea until June 1951. For her first 2 weeks in action, she fired on shore installations at Songjin, screened shipping, and patrolled areas swept of mines to guard against their remaining. During November and December 1950 she continued her fire support and bombardments, covered the redeployments from Kojo, Wonsan, and Hung-nam, and screened salvage operations. On 23 December, while firing at Songjin, she was hit by three shells returned by an enemy shore battery, but suffered no casualties, and only minor damage, which was repaired at Sasebo early in January 1951. She returned to the Korean firing line to cover salvage operations north of the 38th parallel and conduct bombardments along the coast.

As operations leading to the classic blockade of Wonsan began, Charles S. Sperry entered the dangerous harbor 17 January 1951 to provide interdiction fire, and to cover the landings which secured the harbor islands. She cleared the Wonsan area 5 March for Songjin, where she joined in setting the siege, and until 6 June was almost constantly patrolling and firing on shore installations at Songjin. She then sailed for home, arriving at Norfolk 2 July.

Service, 1951-1974 [ edit | edit source ]

Taking up the operating schedule of the Destroyer Force, Atlantic, Charles S. Sperry sailed from Norfolk through 1960. In 1953, 1955, 1956, 1958, and 1959 she cruised in the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. During her 1956 deployment, which coincided with the Suez Crisis, she escorted the transports which evacuated American nationals from Egypt. Midshipmen cruises and North Atlantic Treaty Organization exercises took her to northern European ports on several occasions, some of them in coordination with her Mediterranean deployments.

Late in 1959, Sperry began an extensive overhaul for rehabilitation and modernization, including the addition of a sophisticated remotely operated torpedo equipped anti-submarine helicopter known as Drone Anti Submarine Helicopter (DASH). After completion of the this major refitting she operated on the east coast and was located in Newport RI in the late 1960s.

In the summer of 1968 she cruised the Caribbean and was in San Juan, Puerto Rico in late June as the U S Navy's representative for the celebration of feast of St. John (San Juan), a national holiday.

Chilean Navy [ edit | edit source ]

On 8 January 1974, Charles S. Sperry was transferred to Chile by sale. She was renamed Ministro Zenteno and designated Destroyer #16. After many years of active service in the Chilean Navy, the old destroyer was finally scrapped in 1990.


Charles S Perry DD- 697 - History

USS Charles S. Sperry (DD-697), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was named for Charles Stillman Sperry, the commanding officer of Yorktown. Sperry would later attain the rank of rear admiral.

Charles S. Sperry was launched 13 March 1944 by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearny, New Jersey sponsored by Miss M. Sperry commissioned 17 May 1944, Commander H. H. McIlhenny in command and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

After training in the Hawaiian Islands, Charles S. Sperry arrived at Ulithi 28 December 1944 to join the fast carrier force, TP 38. For the remainder of the war, she sailed in the screen of the third group of this mighty force, variously designated TF 38 and TF 58. She sortied with her group for the first time on 30 December, bound for the areas from which the carriers launched strikes against Japanese bases on Formosa and Luzon in preparation for the assault on Lingayen Gulf beaches. Continuing to neutralize Japanese airfields the force moved on to strike at targets in Indochina, on the South China coast, and on Okinawa before returning to Ulithi 26 January 1945.

Sperry sailed with TF 58 once more on 10 February 1945, as the force began its familiar work in preparation for the invasion of Iwo Jima. An audacious raid against Tokyo itself was first on the schedule, the first carrier strikes on the heart of Japan since the Doolittle Raid. On 16 and 17 February, planes from the carriers guarded by Sperry roared over Tokyo, in attacks which inflicted substantial material damage, and great moral damage, to the Japanese war effort. Sperry forces offered direct support during the assault landings at Iwo Jima. Twice, on 19 February and on 20–21 February, the carrier force came under air attack from the enemy, but antiaircraft fire from Sperry and the other screening ships, combined with evasive maneuvering and a protective smoke screen, prevented damage to the great concentration of ships. A final round of air strikes was hurled at Tokyo and Okinawa before TF 58 returned to Ulithi 5 March.

Once more designated TF 38, the force cleared Ulithi 14 March 1945 for the Okinawa operation, which would keep Sperry and many other ships at sea almost continuously until 1 June. First came air strikes against Kyushu, for which the Japanese retaliated with heavy air attacks against the carrier force on 19 and 20 March. While Franklin was badly damaged in these attacks, Sperry and other escorts furnished effective antiaircraft fire which pre vented further harm to the force, and she shared in splashing several Japanese planes.

USS Charles S. Sperry alongside USS Bunker Hill, 11 May 1945. Sperry turned south with her force for strikes against Okinawa. The destroyer joined in a bombardment of the Japanese airstrip on tiny but critically located Minami Daito Shima 27 March. Close air support was provided by TF 38 as the invasion began on 1 April 1945, and Sperry served as plane guard and radar picket for her force. On 7 April, planes from the carriers she screened joined in sending Yamato, her accompanying cruiser, and four of eight guardian destroyers to the bottom. Sperry herself fired often, aiding in splashing planes of the kamikaze strikes hurled at her force on 11, 14, 16, and 29 April, and 11 May. When Hancock and Bunker Hill fell victim to kamikazes, Sperry stood by them, aiding in damage control, and rescuing men from the water.

The destroyer remained in San Pedro Bay, Philippines, from 1 June to 1 July, and then sailed to support the carriers as they launched the final air strikes at the Japanese home islands. Cover for the first occupation landings and the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Japanese prison camps was flown by the carriers, and on 31 August, the great force arrived off Tokyo Bay for the surrender ceremonies held on 2 September.

Sperry remained in the Far East, taking part in exercises, on patrol, and carrying mail, until 30 December 1945, when she departed Sasebo for the east coast, arriving at Baltimore 19 February 1946. For the next year, she remained at Boston with a reduced crew, and in March 1947, reported at New Orleans for duty as a training ship for members of the Naval Reserve until July 1950. After overhaul at Norfolk, she sailed for the Far East, arriving off embattled Korea 14 October 1950.

The destroyer operated almost continuously off Korea until June 1951. For her first 2 weeks in action, she fired on shore installations at Songjin, screened shipping, and patrolled areas swept of mines to guard against their remaining. During November and December 1950 she continued her fire support and bombardments, covered the redeployments from Kojo, Wonsan, and Hung-nam, and screened salvage operations. On 23 December, while firing at Songjin, she was hit by three shells returned by an enemy shore battery, but suffered no casualties, and only minor damage, which was repaired at Sasebo early in January 1951. She returned to the Korean firing line to cover salvage operations north of the 38th parallel and conduct bombardments along the coast.

As operations leading to the classic blockade of Wonsan began, Charles S. Sperry entered the dangerous harbor 17 January 1951 to provide interdiction fire, and to cover the landings which secured the harbor islands. She cleared the Wonsan area 5 March for Songjin, where she joined in setting the siege, and until 6 June was almost constantly patrolling and firing on shore installations at Songjin. She then sailed for home, arriving at Norfolk 2 July.

Taking up the operating schedule of the Destroyer Force, Atlantic, Charles S. Sperry sailed from Norfolk through 1960. In 1953, 1955, 1956, 1958, and 1959 she cruised in the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. During her 1956 deployment, which coincided with the Suez Crisis, she escorted the transports which evacuated American nationals from Egypt. Midshipmen cruises and North Atlantic Treaty Organization exercises took her to northern European ports on several occasions, some of them in coordination with her Mediterranean deployments.

Late in 1959, Sperry began an extensive overhaul for rehabilitation and modernization, including the addition of a sophisticated remotely operated torpedo equipped anti-submarine helicopter known as Drone Anti Submarine Helicopter (DASH). After completion of this major refitting she operated on the east coast and was located in Newport RI in the late 1960s.

In the summer of 1968 she cruised the Caribbean and was in San Juan, Puerto Rico in late June as the U S Navy's representative for the celebration of feast of St. John (San Juan), a national holiday.

On 8 January 1974, Charles S. Sperry was transferred to Chile by sale. She was renamed Ministro Zenteno and designated Destroyer #16. After many years of active service in the Chilean Navy, the old destroyer was finally scrapped in 1990.

Charles S. Sperry received four battle stars for her service in World War II, and four battle stars for the Korean War.


CHARLES S SPERRY DD 697

This section lists the names and designations that the ship had during its lifetime. The list is in chronological order.

    Allen M. Sumner Class Destroyer
    Keel Laid 19 October 1943 - Launched 13 March 1944

Struck from Naval Register 15 December 1973

Naval Covers

This section lists active links to the pages displaying covers associated with the ship. There should be a separate set of pages for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Covers should be presented in chronological order (or as best as can be determined).

Since a ship may have many covers, they may be split among many pages so it doesn't take forever for the pages to load. Each page link should be accompanied by a date range for covers on that page.

Postmarks

This section lists examples of the postmarks used by the ship. There should be a separate set of postmarks for each incarnation of the ship (ie, for each entry in the "Ship Name and Designation History" section). Within each set, the postmarks should be listed in order of their classification type. If more than one postmark has the same classification, then they should be further sorted by date of earliest known usage.

A postmark should not be included unless accompanied by a close-up image and/or an image of a cover showing that postmark. Date ranges MUST be based ONLY ON COVERS IN THE MUSEUM and are expected to change as more covers are added.
 
>>> If you have a better example for any of the postmarks, please feel free to replace the existing example.

Postmark Type
---
Killer Bar Text

1st Commissioning 17 May 1944 to 15 March 1948

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. C-30a

Locy Type P
[2(n) - number corrected]

USCS Postmark
Catalog Illus. C-30

2nd Commissioning 1 July 1950 to 15 December 1973

First Day Postal Service, cachet by Tazewell G. Nicholson

Other Information

USS CHARLES S. SPERRY received 4 battle stars for World War II, and 4 battle stars for Korea service

NAMESAKE - Admiral Charles Stillman Sperry, USN (3 September 1847 – 1 February 1911)
Sperry, born in Brooklyn, NY, graduated from the Naval Academy in 1866. In November 1898 he became commanding officer of Yorktown, and later served as senior officer of the Southern Squadron on the Asiatic Station and as President of the Naval War College. As a rear admiral, he served in the United States delegation to the Geneva Convention and the Second Hague Conference, and as Commander in Chief, Battle Fleet, he led the Great White Fleet during the major portion of its historic cruise around the world in 1907 and 1908. Admiral Sperry retired 3 September 1909, but subsequently was recalled to active duty for special service. He died in Washington, D.C.

NAMESAKE (Chile) - Ministro Zenteno - José Ignacio Zenteno del Pozo y Silva Chilean military and politician. He was born in Santiago, on 28 July 1786. He died in the same city on 16 July 1847. Son of Antonio Zenteno y Bustamante and Doña Victoria del Pozo y Silva. He attended the Colegio Carolino, where he studied.

The ships sponsor was Miss M. Sperry.

If you have images or information to add to this page, then either contact the Curator or edit this page yourself and add it. See Editing Ship Pages for detailed information on editing this page.


Contents

USS Charles S. Sperry was named for Charles Stillman Sperry, the commanding officer of Yorktown. Sperry would later attain the rank of rear admiral. She was launched 13 March 1944 by Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company, Kearny, New Jersey sponsored by Miss M. Sperry commissioned 17 May 1944, Commander H. H. McIlhenny in command and reported to the Pacific Fleet.

United States Navy Edit

World War II Edit

After training in the Hawaiian Islands, Charles S. Sperry arrived at Ulithi 28 December 1944 to join the fast carrier force, TP 38. For the remainder of the war, she sailed in the screen of the third group of this mighty force, variously designated TF 38 and TF 58. She sortied with her group for the first time on 30 December, bound for the areas from which the carriers launched strikes against Japanese bases on Formosa and Luzon in preparation for the assault on Lingayen Gulf beaches. Continuing to neutralize Japanese airfields the force moved on to strike at targets in Indochina, on the South China coast, and on Okinawa before returning to Ulithi 26 January 1945.

Sperry sailed with TF 58 once more on 10 February 1945, as the force began its familiar work in preparation for the invasion of Iwo Jima. An audacious raid against Tokyo itself was first on the schedule, the first carrier strikes on the heart of Japan since the Doolittle Raid. On 16 and 17 February, planes from the carriers guarded by Sperry roared over Tokyo, in attacks which inflicted substantial material damage, and great moral damage, to the Japanese war effort. Sperry forces offered direct support during the assault landings at Iwo Jima. Twice, on 19 February and on 20–21 February, the carrier force came under air attack from the enemy, but antiaircraft fire from Sperry and the other screening ships, combined with evasive maneuvering and a protective smoke screen, prevented damage to the great concentration of ships. A final round of air strikes was hurled at Tokyo and Okinawa before TF 58 returned to Ulithi 5 March.

Once more designated TF 38, the force cleared Ulithi 14 March 1945 for the Okinawa operation, which would keep Sperry and many other ships at sea almost continuously until 1 June. First came air strikes against Kyushu, for which the Japanese retaliated with heavy air attacks against the carrier force on 19 and 20 March. While Franklin was badly damaged in these attacks, Sperry and other escorts furnished effective antiaircraft fire which pre vented further harm to the force, and she shared in splashing several Japanese planes.

Sperry turned south with her force for strikes against Okinawa. The destroyer joined in a bombardment of the Japanese airstrip on tiny but critically located Minami Daito Shima 27 March. Close air support was provided by TF 38 as the invasion began on 1 April 1945, and Sperry served as plane guard and radar picket for her force. On 7 April, planes from the carriers she screened joined in sending Yamato, her accompanying cruiser, and four of eight guardian destroyers to the bottom. Sperry herself fired often, aiding in splashing planes of the kamikaze strikes hurled at her force on 11, 14, 16, and 29 April, and 11 May. When Hancock and Bunker Hill fell victim to kamikazes, Sperry stood by them, aiding in damage control, and rescuing men from the water.

The destroyer remained in San Pedro Bay, Philippines, from 1 June to 1 July, and then sailed to support the carriers as they launched the final air strikes at the Japanese home islands. Cover for the first occupation landings and the evacuation of Allied prisoners of war from Japanese prison camps was flown by the carriers, and on 31 August, the great force arrived off Tokyo Bay for the surrender ceremonies held on 2 September.

Post-World War II Edit

Sperry remained in the Far East, taking part in exercises, on patrol, and carrying mail, until 30 December 1945, when she departed Sasebo for the east coast, arriving at Baltimore 19 February 1946. For the next year, she remained at Boston with a reduced crew, and in March 1947, reported at New Orleans for duty as a training ship for members of the Naval Reserve until July 1950. After overhaul at Norfolk, she sailed for the Far East, arriving off embattled Korea 14 October 1950.

Korean War Edit

The destroyer operated almost continuously off Korea until June 1951. For her first 2 weeks in action, she fired on shore installations at Songjin, screened shipping, and patrolled areas swept of mines to guard against their remaining. During November and December 1950 she continued her fire support and bombardments, covered the redeployments from Kojo, Wonsan, and Hung-nam, and screened salvage operations. On 23 December, while firing at Songjin, she was hit by three shells returned by an enemy shore battery, but suffered no casualties, and only minor damage, which was repaired at Sasebo early in January 1951. She returned to the Korean firing line to cover salvage operations north of the 38th parallel and conduct bombardments along the coast.

As operations leading to the classic blockade of Wonsan began, Charles S. Sperry entered the dangerous harbor 17 January 1951 to provide interdiction fire, and to cover the landings which secured the harbor islands. She cleared the Wonsan area 5 March for Songjin, where she joined in setting the siege, and until 6 June was almost constantly patrolling and firing on shore installations at Songjin. She then sailed for home, arriving at Norfolk 2 July.

Service, 1951-1974 Edit

Taking up the operating schedule of the Destroyer Force, Atlantic, Charles S. Sperry sailed from Norfolk through 1960. In 1953, 1955, 1956, 1958, and 1959 she cruised in the Mediterranean with the 6th Fleet. During her 1956 deployment, which coincided with the Suez Crisis, she escorted the transports which evacuated American nationals from Egypt. Midshipmen cruises and North Atlantic Treaty Organization exercises took her to northern European ports on several occasions, some of them in coordination with her Mediterranean deployments.

Late in 1959, Sperry began an extensive overhaul for rehabilitation and modernization, including the addition of a sophisticated remotely operated torpedo equipped anti-submarine helicopter known as Drone Anti Submarine Helicopter (DASH). After completion of this major refitting she operated on the east coast and was located in Newport RI in the late 1960s.

In the summer of 1968 she cruised the Caribbean and was in San Juan, Puerto Rico in late June as the U S Navy's representative for the celebration of feast of St. John (San Juan), a national holiday.

Chilean Navy Edit

On 8 January 1974, Charles S. Sperry was transferred to Chile by sale. She was renamed Ministro Zenteno (D-16). After many years of active service in the Chilean Navy, the old destroyer was finally scrapped in 1990.

Charles S. Sperry received four battle stars for her service in World War II, and four battle stars for the Korean War.


The table below contains the names of sailors who served aboard the USS Charles S. Sperry (DD 697). Please keep in mind that this list does only include records of people who submitted their information for publication on this website. If you also served aboard and you remember one of the people below you can click on the name to send an email to the respective sailor. Would you like to have such a crew list on your website?

Looking for US Navy memorabilia? Try the Ship's Store.

There are 42 crew members registered for the USS Charles S. Sperry (DD 697).

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1968 | 1969 &ndash now

NameRank/RatePeriodDivisionRemarks/Photo
Smith, Frank SmittyGMG2Jan 2, 1969 &ndash 19722nd
Dykes, Robert GromettbmsnNov 1, 1969 &ndash Feb 19, 19711 stshipmatesfrom 1969 1971

Select the period (starting by the reporting year): precomm &ndash 1968 | 1969 &ndash now


USS Charles S. Sperry (DD-697)

The USS Charles S. Sperry (DD-697) was a destroyer of Allen M. Sumner class . It was named after Rear Admiral Charles Stillman Sperry .

She was laid down on October 19, 1943 at the Federal Shipbuilding and Drydock Company in Kearny , New Jersey . The launch took place on March 17, 1944, godmother was Miss M. Sperry. The commissioning took place on May 17, 1944 under the command of Commander HH McIlhenny, then the ship was assigned to the US Pacific Fleet.

After training trips near Hawaii, she reached Ulithi on December 28, 1944 and became part of the Fast Carrier Task Force , which, depending on its subordination to the 3rd or 5th Fleet, was alternately designated TF 38 or TF 58. From December 30 to January 26, 1945, she participated as part of this task force in operations against Japanese bases on Formosa and Luzon in preparation for the landing in the Gulf of Lingayen , followed by air strikes against targets in Indochina, on the South China coast and on Okinawa run.

On February 10, 1945, a similar operation took place in preparation for the landing on Iwo Jima. A bold attack was carried out on Tokyo on February 16 and 17, the first since the Doolittle Raid in 1942. She provided fire support during the landing on Iwo Jima and was involved in repelling the air raids on February 19 and 20.

During the landing on Okinawa, she was again used for fire support and anti-aircraft defense. After the carriers USS Hancock and Bunker Hill were hit by Kamikaze planes, she assisted the carriers with rescue and repair work. On August 18, she and the combat group reached Tokyo Bay, where the Japanese surrender was signed on September 2.

In the Korean War it was used for fire support. During a mission, she was hit on December 23, 1950 by three projectiles from a coastal battery, which caused only minor damage. The mission off the Korean coast lasted until June 6, 1951. On July 2, 1951, she reached Norfolk and was assigned to the Destroyer Force Atlantic. With the 6th Fleet she was used in the Mediterranean in 1953, 1955, 1956, 1958 and 1958. During the Suez crisis , she accompanied evacuation transports with US citizens.

In June 1960 the FRAM combat value upgrade was completed. The decommissioning took place on December 15, 1973, the deletion from the Naval Vessel Register on the same day.

After it was sold to the Chilean Navy on January 8, 1974, it was named Ministro Zenteno . In 1990 it was scrapped and scrapped.


Description

We are happy to offer a classic style 5 panel custom US Navy destroyer DD 697 USS Charles S Sperry embroidered hat.

For an additional (and optional) charge of $7.00, our hats can be personalized with up to 2 lines of text of 14 characters each (including spaces), such as with a veteran’s last name and rate and rank on the first line, and years of service on the second line.

Our DD 697 USS Charles S Sperry embroidered hat comes in two styles for your choosing. A traditional “high profile” flat bill snap back style (with an authentic green under visor on the bottom of the flat bill), or a modern “medium profile” curved bill velcro back “baseball cap” style. Both styles are “one size fits all”. Our hats are made of durable 100% cotton for breathability and comfort.

Given high embroidery demands on these “made to order” hats, please allow 4 weeks for shipment.

If you have any questions about our hat offerings, please contact us at 904-425-1204 or e-mail us at [email protected] , and we will be happy to speak to you!


Watch the video: King Charles I 1600-1649 - Pt 13


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