Link Between the Huns and Vizsla Dogs Unravels an Ancient Enigma

Link Between the Huns and Vizsla Dogs Unravels an Ancient Enigma


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The history of the Vizsla or Hungarian Pointer breed goes hand in hand with that of the Huns’ (later called Hungarians’ or Magyars’) and even the history of their language. Recent DNA analysis studies of both Hungarians and their pointers have helped to shed light on the origin of both.

Origins and Spread of the Huns

Huns are thought to have arrived from Central or South Asia, possibly from the Hindu Kush, and may be descendants of Attila’s or Arpad’s Huns. Both Arpad’s and Attila’s emblems were the falcon, a black bird of prey, or turul bird, supporting the theory that they belonged to the same dynasty. Huns introduced falconry to Europe and the history of falconry also includes that of the Vizsla.

Representation of a Hun on horseback with a falcon on his arm. ( Rawpixel.com / Adobe stock)

The Hungarians are believed to be descended from the second son of Japheth, Magog, who “in the fifty-eighth year after the flood” came to Evilah [Persia] and, with his wife Enee had two sons - Magot (from whom were named the Magyars) and Hunor (from whom were named the Huns). One of the sons of Noah, Japheth, possessed large regions including Scythia.

Scythia included regions that have become parts of modern South-Eastern Ukraine, South-Western and Southern Russia, Balkans, Eastern Poland, parts of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Afghanistan, Eastern Iran, South-Western Pakistan, Northern Caucasus region, as well as parts of Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Romania and Bulgaria. According to Sherbowitz-Wetzor, “the land of Scythia is said to be fertile. It is beautiful with groves, woods and pasture, and there is plenteous abundance of animals of different kinds.”

Huns stayed in Scythia until 373 AD. The Illuminated Chronicle (formerly known as Vienna Chronicle), an illustrated manuscript of the early codes and laws dating from the time of King Louis I (1342-1382) of Hungary, is believed to be the most complete record of medieval history of Hungary, going back to the eleventh century. According to it, it was in 373 AD, when the Huns made their entry into Pannonia. Pannonia (today is the part of Hungary, Slovakia, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Herzegovina, Slovenia, and Austria) was under Roman Empire for more than four centuries. Around 430 AD, the whole of the Carpathian basin became part of the Huns’ empire. This is the period when the falconers are mentioned for the first time in The Illuminated Chronicle .

The grandson of Magor, Etele or Attila, became the King of Huns; he reigned from 434 to 453 AD. Attila’s shield carried a coat of arms, a black bird with a crowned head on a silver field. This black bird was a hawk identified as turul [falcon] and called Arpad “ Arpad of the Turul kindred ”, “stressing the continuity between the Huns and Hungarians”. By 1301 AD, twenty-eight Hungarian tribes declared they were derived from turul. Many kingdoms feared Attila and paid taxes to him.

Detail of Attila the Hun from ‘Attila and his Hordes Overrun Italy and the Arts’ (1847). (Eugène Delacroix / )

Hunting Dogs Appear with the Huns

The first images of hunting with dogs in The Illuminated Chronicle as well as a description of hunting scenes appeared around 600-650 AD. One day the Huns went hunting with their dogs, got lost, and eventually found the place “suited for feeding herds”, the Meotis region near Persia. This land was near the sea, rich in grass and water, fish and birds. They stayed on this land for five years. During this period, Hungarians met Bulgarians and they dwelled together (around 600-650 AD). Hunor and Magor kidnapped the daughters of the Prince of the Alans and made them their wives, starting ethnic Huns, the Hungarians.

Huns in battle with the Alans. (Johann Nepomuk Geiger / )

Sometime around 741 – 751 AD, the Huns left Scythia for the second time, and entered and settled in Pannonia for another six or seven years, before continuing their journey later on. In 896 AD, Magyars arrived for the second time in the Carpathian basin. On their way, the Huns passed the White Cumans, Suzdal, Kiev, crossed the Alps, Carpathian Mountains, and arrived in the Transylvanian German city Szeben (Hermammstadt, today Sibiu). The Russian Primary Chronicle dates the Hungarians passing Kiev to 898 AD.

Transylvania had seven counties/ tribes, for which seven captains were appointed. Almos’ son Arpad was one of these seven captains and he took possession of the Danube region. Arpad picked the land with “good and fertile land all around, and a good river flowing through rich meadows”, “sweet water”, and “excellent earth.” Arpad is believed to have purchased the land for a large horse, a golden saddle, and a golden bridle. This second entry of Pannonia by Hungarians led by Arpad, marks the establishment of the Principality of Hungary, later called the Kingdom of Hungary, in the Carpathian basin in 895 or 896 AD. Arpad (also known as the Duke or Prince Arpad) is believed to have been in power until his death in 907 AD.

The conversion to Christianity began around 975 AD, first by the prince Geza and then continued by his son Vajk who was given the name Stephen at his baptism. The Duke and later the king St. Stephen was therefore, a great-grandson of Prince Arpad. The date of coronation of King St. Stephen remains disputed and is believed to be on January 1 st, 1000, or on January 1 st, 1001, or on September 8 th, 1000 AD.

Miniature of the hunt of the White Stag, from the Illuminated Chronicle, with Hunor, Magor and dogs in the foreground. ( Public Domain)

So, The Illuminated Chronicle tells us Hungarians brought their dogs with them. The image from the manuscript’s chapter called Generatio Hunt et Paznan picturing the nobility holding a banner and tournament shield with a picture of the dog’s head on his shield. According to The Illuminated Chronicle , ‘Hunt’ is from ‘Hund’ meaning ‘dog’: “in those days there also came Hont and Razmany, who at the river Hron had girded King St. Stephen with sword…”

This time is identified as being in the early 11 th century (1001/1002). The first images of coats of arms (helmet crests) appeared around 1230s under King Bela IV. Coats of arms identify the important historical figures for a millennium and reflect the heraldry of the kingdom (e.g., silver on red in this instance). Scent hounds and Greyhounds were the only dogs that were found on the coats of arms. It is likely the dog was the Magyar Agar (also known as the Hungarian Greyhound or Hungarian Sighthound), the breed that the Huns brought with them to Europe.

King St. Stephen reigned for about four decades and died on August 15 th, 1038. It is under his leadership that Hungary was formed, and the kingdom of Hungary remained in high power for over five centuries. The kingdom of Hungary extended over the whole of the Carpathian basin, and it was three times larger than the present country of Hungary. Until 1918 AD, it also included present parts of Ukraine, Romania, Austria, Serbia, and Croatia.

Vizslas Appear

In the 12 th century, Hungarians were called Pannons (or Pannonians) and Scythians. Every time Hungarians moved, they brought their horses, arms, and dogs with them. S ome of these dogs were closely resembling Vizslas, being brown-colored and with drooped ears. Hunting with hunting dogs is mentioned several times in The Illuminated Chronicle with the first descriptions appearing as early as in the 11 th century.

Hunting with falcons is captured in the scene describing Duke Almos hunting in the Bakony in 1106. “In the mountains of this desolate place is found crystal, gryphons make their nest, and the falcons which in Hungarians are called kerecset here bring forth their brood” (Sherbowitz-Wetzor). The manuscript’s chapter called De Constructione Ecclesie Demes includes an image of people mounted on horses observing a falcon, a dog, and a crow. The first image of a Vizsla-like dog to appear in Codex Albensis (Hungarian manuscript written in 12 th century) is dated 1100 AD; it is a pencil drawing believed to be of a Vizsla pointing at a rabbit sitting under a tree ( ninehungariandogs.org).

Partridge-dogs are in 13 th century literature, describing dogs “with falling ears, which know of beasts and birds by the scent, therefore they are useful for sporting” (Arkwright). Up to the end of 15 th century, the Hungarian kings spent most of their time hunting in the mountains on the royal hunting lands.

It was thanks to King Louis the Great (1342-1382) who ordered The Illuminated Chronicle to be written, to summarize Hungarian history until 1330 AD. Nobles cared about their dogs and King Louis was known by his passion for hunting and his devotion to dogs. He rebuilt several castles and palaces where he liked to hunt with his dogs.

The year 1358 is believed to be the first time when brown hounds are described in writing and colored images of a brown true-to-type Vizsla-like dog appeared in the books. The first true-to-type colored image of a Vizsla is found on one of the 14 th century Gothic panels in the Esztergom Christian Museum (Hungary).

14th century Gothic panel believed to be the first colored image of a Vizsla. (Keresztény Múzeum, Esztergom / Photograph by Attila Mudrák / provided by the author)

Gaston Phebus, the famous owner of more than fifteen hundred dogs collected from various European countries, who (in France) in 1387 AD had “smooth-haired”, “falcon-dogs ( chien d’oisel )” and some of those being “cinnamon color ( canele).” These dogs went “in front of birds willingly”, were used to hunt with “goshawk or falcon, lanner or tassel-hawk”, and were “good for taking partridges and quail with the net…” (Arkwright).

The St. Albans Press’ book (1487) describes the existence of fourteen different breeds in Europe. This suggests that people at that time had already started the selection process and breeding practices. The pointers were bred to specifically point their bodies towards the birds and freeze. At first, these bird dogs were used to hunt with hawks / falcons, then with nets (hunters dropped a net over both the birds – partridges and quails - and the dog), then with crossbows, and later, when firearms were developed, flintlock - in the mid-16 th century and muzzleloader rifles - in the late 17 th century.

The Illuminated Chronicle includes descriptions of scenes of hunting with dogs. One of the first manuscript’s chapters called Prima origo dilationis Hungarorum in oriente Scythie portrays a hunting scene with two groups of hunters dressed as 14 th century knights holding several hounds with at least one of them having close resemblance to a Vizsla, and a bear. Janos Gyulai in 1563 AD wrote (in Latin) to Kristof Batthyani: "we know that your Honor possesses smaller sized hawks. Don't leave us without one or two of them. And do send us please a bird chasing Vizsla too. (Sed et canem odoranium vulgo fyrejre valo Vizslath nobis dare velli)." (the Hungarian Vizsla Society’s archives).

The DNA Trail Reveals New Links

Human DNA Y-chromosome haplogroup analysis sheds additional light on the migration routes of Hungarian tribes and their dogs. The DNA haplogroup R1a (M420 mutation) is believed to be approximately 25,000 years old and tied to Northern India or Southern Russia. R1a believed crossed the Caucasus during the Neolithic time (which started 12,000 years ago and ended 3,500 BC). The R1a haplogroup distribution pattern suggests the Huns’ migration route was from the Northern India-Caucasus to Georgia-Southern Russia and then – to Ukraine, Slovakia and Poland, later on – to Hungary, Romania, Austria, Serbia, Germany, followed by Finland, Netherlands, Wales, and Portugal.

Of special importance though is R1a1a1 (M417) haplogroup as it is estimated to occur approximately 5,800 years ago and is tied to Europe. One half of Hungarian males carry R1a1a human paternal DNA haplogroup, believed to be an Indo-European marker that arrived from the Yamna Culture . Yamna Culture was originated between the lower Don River, the lower Volga river, and North Caucasus 3,300 – 2,700 BC. Nomads lived there from farming, fishing, and hunting.

Recently studied, King Bela III of Hungary’s (1148-1196 AD) paternal DNA was identified as R1a (Z93). Z93 is common in Asia and this mutation happened around 5,800 years ago, which is consistent with the legend of the king’s ancestral roots. King Bela III the Great was an important ruler who, while in power, consolidated Hungary’s dominance over Northern Balkans. He was the son of King Geza II and Queen Euphrosyne, the daughter of Great Prince of Kiev, Mstislav I.

Commonalities are also found between the Hungarian language and Sanskrit. A connection was established between the R1a1a1 (M417) marker and the spread of Indo-European languages. Proto-Indo-European’s Proto-Slavic-speaking group believed to move from Indo-Pakistan to Central Europe and then, during the early Middle Ages , to the North-Eastern part of Europe. The official (written) language of Hungary until 1844 was Latin. There are believed to be the Avars who were like Huns nomadic horsemen breeding livestock. The generally accepted theory was that they spoke Onogurus (form of Turkic and also was the language of early Bulgarians). However, Pal Engal AA and Pal Engel suggest that this could have been Ongri and thus Hungarian, given the fact the ongri was early Slavonic name of Hungarians.

Genetic, archaeological, and historical records seem to support the theory that migrating Hungarians (or Huns, as per Chronica de Gestis Hungarorum e Codice Picto Saec,1358) were the ones who brought their dogs, the Vizsla ancestors, with them. Hunting was among the first desired traits during the dog domestication.

The evolution of wolf to domestic pet. ( CC BY SA 4.0 )

  • The End of the Huns: The Death of Attila and the Fall of the Hunnic Empire
  • Merciless Marauders or Fearsome Fighters? The Terror Tactics of the Huns
  • In Jordan, Neolithic Hunters Used Domesticated Dogs as Small Prey Hunting Companions

Dog breed migration is known to mirror human migration followed by admixture with the native dog population in a new region. The Vizsla’s paternal haplogroup is A1a and the Embark, a pioneer company in the dog DNA studies, states that “all Vizslas come from this [A1a] lineage, suggesting that... all male Vizslas descend from this line.” Dogs “followed their humans from Asia to Europe…, eventually becoming the dogs that founded the Vizsla breed 1,000 years ago.” The common maternal haplotypes found in Vizslas are A234 and A315. The A315, originated in Central Asia 15,000 years ago and “found in ancient Bronze Age fossils in the Middle East and Southern Europe” (Embark), became common in Europe after the end of the Bronze Age.

Summarizing the Vizsla Breed Origins

The Hungarian tribes brought their dogs (possibly, the Magyar Agar) and mixed them with the ancient native Pannon (or Pannonia) hound. Huns made their first entry into Pannonia in 373 AD and then again – in 895 or 896 AD, and covered the entire Europe by the 9 th – 10 th centuries. Therefore, the mix of the Pannonia hound and the Magyar Agar potentially could have occurred as early as in the 4 th century or in the 9 th – 11 th century, at the latest.

The separation of the Vizsla breed was completed by 12th-13 th century. The first written word “Vizsla” appeared in the 1300s. The first true-to-type colored image of the Vizsla appeared on a 14 th century Gothic panel. Historical manuscripts and human and canine DNA haplogroup analysis suggest the Vizsla breed is an ancient breed, and its history is closely tied to that of the Huns.

Acknowledgements: I would like to thank Ms. Diana Boggs for her devotion to the Vizsla breed, for pushing me further in my research and exploring, and to my peers, especially to Ms. Audrey Zatarian and Ms. Terina McLaren for providing their valuable comments and critique.


Ancient Egypt is known for many things that immediately come to mind: pyramids, large temples, and the life-giving Nile River are the three most apparent, and of course, there are hundreds of other features that made the early civilization among the most important and unique in the ancient world. One of the less apparent but no less important features of ancient Egyptian civilization was its amazing stability and endurance. Pharaonic culture existed in some form for more than 3,000 years and an Egyptian state functioned on and off, more the former than the latter, for almost as long. The power of the Egyptian state did not just happen overnight, but it was instead the culmination of a long process.

Egypt before the pharaohs referred to by scholars as “Pre-Dynastic Egypt,” was a land that was divided by north and south and can be more accurately described as two lands. The regions developed separately until around 3,100 when a strong leader named Narmer, “Menes” in the Greek texts, forcefully united the two lands and created the First Dynasty, ushering in the “Early Dynastic Period” of ancient Egyptian history in the process. Narmer created the Egyptian state, but it was the responsibility of his successors in the First and Second dynasties to ensure that the state would survive. Narmer’s successors did so by consolidating the power base he created around the new city of Memphis as well as making the southern city of Abydos an important spiritual center.


Contents

Among archaeologists the wall is also known as "The Red Snake" (Turkmen: Qizil Alan) because of the colour of its bricks. In Persian, it was popularized by the name "Alexander Barrier" ( سد اسکندر ‎ Sadd-i-Iskandar) or "Alexander's Wall", as Alexander the Great is thought by early Muslims to have passed through the Caspian Gates on his hasty march to Hyrcania and the east. It is also known as the "Anushirvân Barrier" ( سد انوشیروان ‎ Sadd-i Anushiravan) and "Firuz/Piruz Barrier" ( سد پیروز ‎), and is officially referred to as "Gorgan Defence Wall" ( دیوار دفاعی گرگان ‎). It is known as Qïzïl Yïlan or Qazal Al'an to local Iranian Turkmens. [1]

The barrier consists of a wall, 195 km (121 mi) long and 6–10 m (20–33 ft) wide, [6] with over 30 fortresses at intervals of between 10 and 50 km (6.2 and 31.1 mi). [6] [7]

The building materials consist of mud-brick, fired brick, gypsum, and mortar. Clay was also used during the early Parthian period. Mud-bricks were more popular in the early period in the construction of forts and cities, while fired bricks became popular in the later period. Sometimes one brick was set in the vertical position, with two horizontal rows of bricks laid above and below. The sizes of mud or fired bricks differ, but in general the standard size was 40 × 40 × 10 cm. [1] The fired bricks were made from the local loess soil, and fired in kilns along the line of the wall. [6]

This wall starts from the Caspian coast, circles north of Gonbade Kavous (ancient Gorgan, or Jorjan in Arabic), continues towards the northeast, and vanishes in the Pishkamar Mountains. The wall lies slightly to the north of a local river, and features a 5 m (16 ft) ditch that conducted water along most of the wall. [2]

In 1999 a logistical archaeological survey was conducted regarding the wall due to problems in development projects, especially during construction of the Golestan Dam, which irrigates all the areas covered by the wall. At the point of the connection of the wall and the drainage canal from the dam, architects discovered the remains of the Great Wall of Gorgan. The 40 identified fortresses vary in dimension and shape but the majority are square fortresses, made of the same brickwork as the wall itself and at the same period. [2] Due to many difficulties in development and agricultural projects, archaeologists have been assigned to mark the boundary of the historical find by laying cement blocks.

Larger than Hadrian's Wall and the Antonine Wall taken together (two separate structures in Britain that marked the northern limits of the Roman Empire), it has been called the greatest monument of its kind between Europe and China. The wall is second only to the walls that make up the Great Wall of China as the longest defensive wall in existence, and although now in substantial disrepair, it was perhaps even more solidly built than the early forms of the Great Wall. [2]

The route, from east to west, is represented by the coordinates of the remains of the following forts and other features which lie along the wall. The coordinates and fort numbers, etc. are from Wikimapia:

If we assumed that the forts were occupied as densely as those on Hadrian's Wall, then the garrison on the Gorgan Wall would have been in the order of 30,000 men. Models, taking into account the size and room number of the barrack blocks in the Gorgan Wall forts and likely occupation density, produce figures between 15,000 and 36,000 soldiers. Even the lowest estimate suggests a strong and powerful army, all the more remarkable as our investigations focused just on 200km of vulnerable frontier, a small fraction of the thousands of kilometres of borders of one of the ancient world's largest empires. [2]

Derbent and its Caspian Gates are at the western part of the historical region of Hyrcania. While the fortification and walls on the east side of the Caspian Sea remained unknown to the Graeco-Roman historians, the western half of the impressive "northern fortifications" in the Caucasus were well known to Classical authors. [ citation needed ]


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The name Caspian Gates originally applied to the narrow region at the southeast corner of the Caspian Sea, through which Alexander actually marched in the pursuit of Bessus, although he did not stop to fortify it. It was transferred to the passes through the Caucasus, on the other side of the Caspian, by the more fanciful historians of Alexander.

Josephus, a Jewish historian in the 1st century, is known to have written of Alexander's gates, designed to be a barrier against the Scythians. According to this historian, the people whom the Greeks called Scythians were known (among the Jews) as Magogites, descendants of Magog in the Hebrew Bible. These references occur in two different works. The Jewish War states that the iron gates Alexander erected were controlled by the king of Hyrcania (on the south edge of the Caspian), and allowing passage of the gates to the Alans (whom Josephus considered a Scythic tribe) resulted in the sack of Media. Josephus's Antiquities of the Jews contains two relevant passages, one giving the ancestry of Scythians as descendants of Magog son of Japheth, and another that refers to the Caspian Gates being breached by Scythians allied to Tiberius during the Armenian War. [a] [3]

The Gates are also mentioned in Procopius' History of the Wars: Book I. Here they are mentioned as the Caspian Gates and they are a source of diplomatic conflict between the Byzantines and the Sassanid Persians. When the current holder of the gates passes away, he bequeaths it to Emperor Anastasius. Anatasius, unable and unwilling to finance a garrison for the gates, loses them in an assault by the Sassanid King Cabades (Kavadh I). After peace, Anastasius builds the city of Dara, which would be a focus point for war during the reign of Justinian and site of the Battle of Dara. In this war, the Persians once again bring up the gates during negotiations, mentioning that they block the pass to the Huns for the benefit of both Persians and Byzantines, and that the Persians deserve to be compensated for their service. [4]

The Gates occur in later versions of the Alexander Romance of Pseudo-Callisthenes, in the interpolated chapter on the "Unclean Nations" (8th century). This version locates the gates between two mountains called the "Breasts of the North" (Greek: Μαζοί Βορρά [5] ). The mountains are initially 18 feet apart and the pass is rather wide, but Alexander's prayers to God causes the mountains to draw nearer, thus narrowing the pass. There he builds the Caspian Gates out of bronze, coating them with fast-sticking oil. The gates enclosed twenty-two nations and their monarchs, including Goth and Magoth (Gog and Magog). The geographic location of these mountains is rather vague, described as a 50-day march away northwards after Alexander put to flight his Belsyrian enemies (the Bebrykes, [6] of Bithynia in modern-day North Turkey). [7] [8]

A similar story also appears in the Qur'an, Surat al-Kahf 83–98. The Qur'an describes a figure known as Dhul Qarnayn, widely believed to be Alexander the Great, who built a wall made of iron between two mountains to defend the people from Yajuj and Majuj. [9]

During the Middle Ages, the Gates of Alexander story was included in travel literature such as the Travels of Marco Polo and the Travels of Sir John Mandeville. The identities of the nations trapped behind the wall are not always consistent, however Mandeville claims Gog and Magog are really the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel, who will emerge from their prison during the End Times and unite with their fellow Jews to attack the Christians. Polo speaks of Alexander's Iron Gates, but says the Comanians are the ones trapped behind it. He does mention Gog and Magog, however, locating them north of Cathay. Some scholars have taken this as an oblique and confused reference to the Great Wall of China, which he does not mention otherwise. The Gates of Alexander may represent an attempt by Westerners to explain stories from China of a great king building a great wall. [ citation needed ] Knowledge of Chinese innovations such as the compass and south-pointing chariot is known to have been diffused (and confused) across Eurasian trade routes.

The medieval German legend of the Red Jews was partially based on stories of the Gates of Alexander. The legend disappeared before the 17th century.

It is not clear which precise location Josephus meant when he described the Caspian gates. It may have been the Gates of Derbent (lying due east, nearer to Persia), or it may have been the Darial Gorge, lying west, bordering Iberia, located between present-day Ingushetia and Georgia.

However, neither of these were within Hyrcania, but lay to the north and west of its boundaries. Another suggestion is some mountain pass in the Taurus-Zagros Mountains, somewhere near Rhaegae, Iran, in the heart of Hyrcania. [10]

Derbent Edit

The Gates of Alexander are most commonly [ citation needed ] identified with the Caspian Gates of Derbent, whose thirty north-looking towers used to stretch for forty kilometers between the Caspian Sea and the Caucasus Mountains, effectively blocking the passage across the Caucasus.

Derbent was built around a Sassanid Persian fortress, which served as a strategic location protecting the empire from attacks by the Gokturks. The historical Caspian Gates were not built until probably the reign of Khosrow I in the 6th century, long after Alexander's time, but they came to be credited to him in the passing centuries. The immense wall had a height of up to twenty meters and a thickness of about 10 feet (3 m) when it was in use.

Darial Edit

The Pass of Dariel or Darial has also been known as the "Gates of Alexander" and is a strong candidate for the identity of the Caspian Gates. [11]

Wall of Gorgan Edit

An alternative theory links the Caspian Gates to the so-called "Alexander's Wall" (the Great Wall of Gorgan) on the south-eastern shore of the Caspian Sea, 180 km of which is still preserved today, albeit in a very poor state of repair. [12]

The Great Wall of Gorgan was built during the Parthian dynasty simultaneously with the construction of the Great Wall of China and it was restored during the Sassanid era (3rd–7th centuries) [13]


What event turned Scythia into Tartary?

A while back I ran into the map below. It's always interesting why geographical names change, but we rarely get any explanations. This transition from Scythia to Tartary is not an exception. As far as I understand, it's impossible to estimate the true size of Scythia due to the lack of available information. By that I do not imply that it was bigger than Tartary.

  • Tartaria, que Sarmatiam Asiaticam & vtramque Scythiam veterum comprehendit.
  • KD:I can't get a meaningful translation for the above. If you have any ideas, please share below.

I doubt that tent dwellers would bother building cities similar to Tartarian Quinsay. I doubt that they could, unless they were not the barbarians TPTB claims they were. Of course, our pseudo-historians placed Quinsay in China, but a simple map analysis can easily dispute that, and place it farther North. There are many more cities and towns not being properly researched by the establishment. Instead, they feed us historical baloney, while our conniving Vatican keeps the truth hidden in their Secret Archives. But. we have Prester John to cover.

After the coming of the Mongols to the Western world, accounts placed the king in Central Asia, and eventually Portuguese explorers came to believe that they had found him in Ethiopia.

  • Argon. Once there was in Asia a Christian kingdom known to Prester John, and D. Thomas founded it in this place, so that it was in contact with the church of Rome, and was subjected to Rome through Prester John of Africa. Before it was defeated by the Goths, it was known as Criue Romoue.

Prester John and D. Thomas

So, we have Prester John and some D. Thomas. Who could this D. Thomas be? Establishing who this D. Thomas was, could help us better understand historical time frames we are dealing with. It won't assist with dates much, but it could help out with figuring out who was alive at the time.

  • Didymus is the second name given for the Apostle Thomas in three places in the Gospel of John: 11:1620:2421:2.
  • With Didymus and Thomas both meaning "twin," the real name here is Judas.
  • Thomas called Didymus
  • Was the apostle Thomas actually Jesus Christ’s twin brother?

  • The letter notes that John is the guardian of the shrine of St. Thomas , the apostle to India.

Without being a part of the HRE aka Roman Empire, Pontius Pilate would have never had the double headed eagle on his palace, or on his "raised seat." We are not supposed to think that it was a throne. By the way, the palace, as well, is being called court in most places. Funny, but Pilate is not even a name, and he was a prelate, not a governor or procurator. Wouldn't it be something if a certain bishop contributed to the death of a certain Savior ? Of course, a procurator would sounds much safer for the narrative and its creators. There is so much more to it.

Jesus in front of Pontius Pilate

As far as TPTB claims of the tremendous antiquity assigned to some of the double headed eagles, simply remember, that we live in the world of pre-1400's copies, rumors and hearsays. This world could be billions of years old, but our sources are very young.

This 2nd millennium BC eagle below is not that old, and can't be much older than any other double headed bird out there.

We have no way of knowing how many times the "Jesus Event" has taken place. May be the BC/AD one was the first one, and may be it was not. Our Bible is a questionable source, but we do not have too many JESUS EVENT related sources to start with. Anyways, there Matthew 24 goes.

  • 36:But about that day or hour no one knows, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father.
  • 37:As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.
  • 38:For in the days before the flood, people were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, up to the day Noah entered the ark
  • 39:and they knew nothing about what would happen until the flood came and took them all away. That is how it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.
  • 40:Two men will be in the field one will be taken and the other left.
  • 41:Two women will be grinding with a hand mill one will be taken and the other left.
  • Genesis 6.5 - And God saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.
  • Genesis 6.11 - The earth also was corrupt before God, and the earth was filled with violence.
  • Genesis 6.12- God saw the earth, and behold, it was corrupt, for all flesh had corrupted their way on the earth .
  • Genesis 6.13 - And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me for the earth is filled with violence through them and, behold, I will destroy them with the earth.
    And after this they (Nephilim) sinned against the beasts and birds, and all that moved and walked on the earth , and much blood was shed on the earth, and men continually desired only what was useless and evil.

As you remember from the above, Prester John was a ruler presiding over a realm full of riches and strange creatures like centaurs. Centaurs (and other beings) were not created by God. Their existence should have contributed to achieving "As it was in the days of Noah" when "all flesh had corrupted their way on the earth" . The JESUS EVENT was triggered, and we sure did have Jesus (BC/AD) who somehow paid for the sins of men. Once again we have no giants, no chimeras and no non-human humanoids that we know of. But. at some point "Two men will be in the field one will be taken and the other left" and "Two women will be grinding with a hand mill one will be taken and the other left" .

The Age of Discovery should be renamed, for it really was the Age of Re-Discovery . IMHO, the reason Scythia became Tartary could be related to the JESUS EVENT taking place some time prior to the 1400s. These early 1400s were the time frame when everything started happening. Shortly after, droves of ruin artists started to "make stuff up".

  • We could never have a life worthy of God on our own. So Jesus lived a life without sin on our behalf. And then he died the painful death our sins deserve.
  • By sacrificing himself for us on the cross, he took the punishment for all of our sins at once.
  • This made him the ultimate sacrifice - once and for all satisfying the demands God’s justice required.
    • KD: But. As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.
    • The Scythians - the Greeks' name for this initially nomadic people - inhabited Scythia from at least the 11th century BC to the 2nd century AD. In the seventh century BC, the Scythians controlled large swaths of territory throughout Eurasia, from the Black Sea across Siberia to the borders of China. Its location and extent varied over time, but it usually extended farther to the west and significantly farther to the east than is indicated on the map. Some sources document that the Scythians were energetic but peaceful people. Not much is known about them.
    • By the 3rd century AD, the Sarmatians and last remnants of the Scythians were dominated by the Alans, and were being overwhelmed by the Goths. By the early Middle Ages, the Scythians and the Sarmatians had been largely assimilated and absorbed by early Slavs.
    • The name of the Scythians survived in the region of Scythia. Early authors continued to use the term "Scythian", applying it to many groups unrelated to the original Scythians, such as Huns, Goths, Türks, Avars, Khazars, and other unnamed nomads.

    Apparently when the below 1179 book was written, they did not know about the Scythian Gold. Same old probables, perhapses and seemses in 1779.

    As you can see, we do not know jack about anything. Yup, in 1779, the PTB was using the exact same tools of the trade. Additionally, it appears (if you reed between the lines) that the narrative prefers the word Thracian. Who needs Scythians?

    And even the above 1779 "Kings of Scythia" list is incomplete, for here are three coats of arms of Scythian Kings and Queens. Only Thomyris is in the above 1779 cutout.

    Scythians Ceneus and Minthia are covered here. As far as Tomyris goes, here is what the same 1779 book says.

    Somehow coats of arms matched again. How could that happen?

    Queen Tomyris Rejects Cyrus's Proposal of Marriage

    If this is what one of the Scythian towns really looked like (in addition to the foreground structures), we are in trouble.

    We also have interesting unverifiable pieces of information like this.

    Most of the golden coins are titled Thracian/Scythian or Indo-Scythian, but all of them are junk when compared to the alleged Scythian Gold craftsmanship. I do not think these coins have anything to do with the makers of the Scythian Gold.

    KD: Unfortunately, I was unable to get to Argon, Tenduc, Serica and other interesting names mentioned on this 1598 map. As you can see, this article got out of hands and is too long as is. To be honest, I doubt that we have any information drastically different from the offered narrative. At the same time little differences do present themselves. For example, I noticed that where older texts say "Scythian", some of our contemporary ones use the word "Thracian".

    I have to admit, that with Scythia, the PTB did a pretty good job purging the house. Yet, I do believe that there is some information waiting to be found out there.

    KorbenDallas

    Gnosis

    New member

    It's a deliberate quantum entanglement of contradictions, illogical anomalies & idiosyncrasies imo. Twistory is full of enigma's purposely. Mythos, Muthos, legends, folklore, superstitions et alia. Rome & it's coterie of cohorts have been covering up lies as fast as honest humans dig them up from the git go. Ego is not our Amigo. Once the ego is triggered & engaged all rational logos is kaput. Cognitive dissonance & Dunbar's number trigger all types of non-critical thinkers. It's important to keep that in context when trying to unravel the enigmas.

    They lie & we know they lie. They know we know they lie.

    Otherlane

    New member

    Great post it took me a couple times to go over it. I was thinking about something after the mention of Alexios I Komnenos the former Byzantine emperor (who Fomenko I believe says plays the Biblical character of Christ in his New Chronology of History, which is a theory I don't subscribe to but I do believe the timeframe around his reign is very significant in a power shift between rival factions "East and West")

    On his Wikipedia entry (no not my favorite source either), the first two paragraphs caught my attention.

    Alexios was the son of the Domestic of the Schools John Komnenos and Anna Dalassene, and the nephew of Isaac I Komnenos (emperor 1057–1059). Alexios' father declined the throne on the abdication of Isaac, who was thus succeeded by four emperors of other families between 1059 and 1081. Under one of these emperors, Romanos IV Diogenes (1068–1071), Alexios served with distinction against the Seljuq Turks.[Under Michael VII Doukas Parapinakes (1071–1078) and Nikephoros III Botaneiates (1078–1081), he was also employed, along with his elder brother Isaac, against rebels in Asia Minor, Thrace, and in Epirus.

    In 1074, western mercenaries led by Roussel de Bailleul rebelled in Asia Minor, but Alexios successfully subdued them by 1076. In 1078, he was appointed commander of the field army in the West by Nikephoros III. In this capacity, Alexios defeated the rebellions of Nikephoros Bryennios the Elder (whose son or grandson later married Alexios' daughter Anna) and Nikephoros Basilakes, the first at the Battle of Kalavrye and the latter in a surprise night attack on his camp. Alexios was ordered to march against his brother-in-law Nikephoros Melissenos in Asia Minor but refused to fight his kinsman. This did not, however, lead to a demotion, as Alexios was needed to counter the expected invasion of the Normans of Southern Italy, led by Robert Guiscard.

    We know about the Turkish/Mongol/Tartar conquests of the Eastern Byzantine Empire when Constantinople becomes Istanbul. We know that the papacy had split between "Rome" and Avignon, France. History states the Komnenos and the Byzantines fought against the Seljuq Turks and the Normans (French) who had invaded Southern Italy (Rome's backyard). I have given my opinions in the past that Revelations (supposedly written by John of Patmos in Greece aka Byzantine Empire) is actually discussing the Mongol invasion of the West (primarily Byzantine). The Beast of Revelations is referred to as one that is a deceiver of all nations. What we see here are the Roman Empire of Rome and Byzantine having a conflict with the Turkic world and the French. That same French kingdom is also the one that supposedly wanted the Knights Templar erased. I don't have the answers but I think an area to explore regarding the pieces of our neverending history puzzle is to see if there was some relations between the French and primarily Islamic Tartar/Mongols against Rome and Byzantium and see how deep that can go.


    Link Between the Huns and Vizsla Dogs Unravels an Ancient Enigma - History

    Augie Aleksy, owner of Centuries & Sleuths Bookstore in Forest Park, Ill., knows he’s one cool bookseller. How cool is he? Cool enough to be called that by many of his customers. Cool enough that the Chicago Tribune named his store one of the Ten Best Bookstores in Chicago.

    And cool enough to have earned the Raven Award from the Mystery Writers of America. Established in 1953, the award recognizes outstanding achievement in the mystery field outside the realm of creative writing. This year, Centuries & Sleuths will share the honor with Once Upon a Crime, in Minneapolis, Minn. (Once Upon a Crime will be profiled April 17.) The Raven will be awarded during the 65th Edgar banquet April 28 in New York City.

    The Top Ten status and the Raven Award rank as Aleksy’s two proudest moments since he opened Centuries & Sleuths 20 years ago. “It seems like all my 'moments’ come in two’s,” said Aleksy.

    Centuries & Sleuths is a warm, inviting and well organized store where a customer can sit in a rocking chair while looking through books. A bust of Sherlock Holmes exclusively commissioned by Centuries & Sleuths graces the bookstore.

    From the day its doors opened, Centuries & Sleuths has been a destination for the discriminating reader, a meeting place for authors and readers and a place for intellectual discussion. And that’s all been a part of Aleksy’s master plan.

    When he was laid off from his job in banking-investments in 1989, he and his wife, Tracy, discussed starting his own business. Aleksy has a bachelor’s degree in political science and two master’s degrees in history and business-finance, so he wasn’t going to rush into a business without thorough analysis. His exhaustive research of bookstores, of readers habits and a survey at a local library proved that the specialties of history, mystery, and biography beat out any other category. The closest was the “Do It Yourself” category, which covered home-repair, gardening and computers. Aleksy took his research seriously. His store specializes in history, mystery and biography, and even some cookbooks that fall into line with these three areas.

    “And what’s wonderful is when I look it over after 15 and then 20 years, many of the programs I wanted to do were dreams, but my friends and close customers helped make them happen,”said Aleksy.

    The bookstore owner also credits his success with the author support he’s received. Authors both in the Chicago area and beyond regularly return to Centuries & Sleuths for signings and show up to support other authors’ events, and buy their colleagues’ books.

    “The authors treat my customers and their reading fans with respect when they talk about their books and writing,” he said.

    And authors have become Aleksy’s unofficial promoters, tauting Centuries & Sleuths to other writers and to members of the press, including during radio and TV interviews.

    “It was through Barbara D’Amato’s reference to our store that the late Stuart Kaminsky came here for a signing with his mother,” Aleksy said. “Some have even used my name or the store’s in their novels, or in the acknowledgement, for the help I’ve given. Some also have dedicated their books to myself and the store.”

    Authors also have brought Aleksy’s two most memorable experiences since owning Centuries & Sleuths – actor/humorist Steve Allen’s visit in 1992 and Sir Peter Ustinov in 1995.

    “It was so remarkable how both came at least 45 minutes before they were due, spoke to my son one-on-one when he was 8 and 11 years old, respectively. Although the ‘private’ conversation was entertaining they made sure of the time and said that ‘No one who comes to see me waits for me.’

    “Their discussions with the audience were fantastic and made you feel like they were on stage at Centuries & Sleuths. Both stayed until all their books were signed. They were both so professional and friendly. Many of our guest authors are like that, but these two individuals were of such stature . . . they didn’t forget their manners.”

    In addition to booksignings, Aleksy is known for scheduling innovative programs such as mock trials and debates.

    One of the store’s first events ever was “The Trial of Richard III” for the murder of his two nephews. A federal court judge, the neighbor of a customer, presided and brought his robes and gavel. Centuries & Sleuths did about 10 performances of that trial with more than 30 people in the audience each time. “The place was packed,” Aleksy fondly recalled.

    The store’s Mystery Discussion Group also has performed six mystery plays, five of which were written by members of the group.

    Among the store’s most popular events are the numerous “Meeting of Minds” programs similar to the PBS series.

    Aleksy had long been fascinated by Dutch writer and historian Henryk van Loon’s book in which a variety of historial figures would meet for dinner and discussions. When he was making up his business plan, Aleksy recalled that book and also how Steve Allen would have actors portray the likes of Attila the Hun, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther on his PBS series Meeting of Minds that aired during the 1970s. To date, the store has put on 17 Meeting of Minds with more than 50 historical characters such as Ben Franklin, Edward R. Morrow, Sir A.C. Doyle, Edgar Allen Poe, Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, G.B. Shaw, Bram Stocker, W.E.B. Du Bois, and more.

    Again, Aleksy knows he can count on authors. “The authors will adjust their tight schedules to be here, or explain why they can’t make it.”

    Aleksy has plans for more events. He’d like to do a “Page to Screen,” comparing books to film adaptations and What’s Cooking in History & Mystery. But his next “big” brainstorm is a trivia contest between the History and Mystery Discussion Groups. “Both teams are pretty enthusiastic about the challenge. My wife, Tracy, and I have drawn up at least 50 questions in both categories, but we have to work on mechanics such as rules, time limits. But, my plans are to execute the first contest sometime around the Fourth of July. It always helps to have a deadline.”

    Times are tough for bookstores and the publishing industry, but Aleksy’s secrets to his succes are simple.

    “I am doing what I want, being creative, imaginative, not being too easily discouraged, having the almost perfect family to be in this business, being friendly and conciliatory as needed, stubborn and firm when necessary, having good customers and intelligent friends, being lucky, and working hard to keep my luck ‘good.’

    “I also am watching the bottom line and budget, but not letting it be the sole basis for my decision making. Consulting with smart people like my wife, my accountant and my attorney. But, realizing in all this, the ultimate plan and responsibility are mine.”

    Aleksy makes the bookstore business sound simple. Maybe too simple. Back in the mid-1990s, a man called to ask if Aleksy would buy his books since he was closing the bookstore he had opened in Melrose Park, Ill.

    The man said it was Aleksy’s fault he was closing.

    “Then he explained that he had been to our signing for Steve Allen and that he had a great time and that I made it look like so much fun and easy,” said Aleksy. “Therefore, I was responsible his leaving his job as an electrician and opening a bookstore that flopped. I said, ‘You should have spoken to me first.’ He said, ‘Ya, ya, ya!’ ”

    Augie Aleksy, owner of Centuries & Sleuths Bookstore in Forest Park, Ill., knows he’s one cool bookseller. How cool is he? Cool enough to be called that by many of his customers. Cool enough that the Chicago Tribune named his store one of the Ten Best Bookstores in Chicago.

    And cool enough to have earned the Raven Award from the Mystery Writers of America. Established in 1953, the award recognizes outstanding achievement in the mystery field outside the realm of creative writing. This year, Centuries & Sleuths will share the honor with Once Upon a Crime, in Minneapolis, Minn. (Once Upon a Crime will be profiled April 17.) The Raven will be awarded during the 65th Edgar banquet April 28 in New York City.

    The Top Ten status and the Raven Award rank as Aleksy’s two proudest moments since he opened Centuries & Sleuths 20 years ago. “It seems like all my 'moments’ come in two’s,” said Aleksy.

    Centuries & Sleuths is a warm, inviting and well organized store where a customer can sit in a rocking chair while looking through books. A bust of Sherlock Holmes exclusively commissioned by Centuries & Sleuths graces the bookstore.

    From the day its doors opened, Centuries & Sleuths has been a destination for the discriminating reader, a meeting place for authors and readers and a place for intellectual discussion. And that’s all been a part of Aleksy’s master plan.

    When he was laid off from his job in banking-investments in 1989, he and his wife, Tracy, discussed starting his own business. Aleksy has a bachelor’s degree in political science and two master’s degrees in history and business-finance, so he wasn’t going to rush into a business without thorough analysis. His exhaustive research of bookstores, of readers habits and a survey at a local library proved that the specialties of history, mystery, and biography beat out any other category. The closest was the “Do It Yourself” category, which covered home-repair, gardening and computers. Aleksy took his research seriously. His store specializes in history, mystery and biography, and even some cookbooks that fall into line with these three areas.

    “And what’s wonderful is when I look it over after 15 and then 20 years, many of the programs I wanted to do were dreams, but my friends and close customers helped make them happen,”said Aleksy.

    The bookstore owner also credits his success with the author support he’s received. Authors both in the Chicago area and beyond regularly return to Centuries & Sleuths for signings and show up to support other authors’ events, and buy their colleagues’ books.

    “The authors treat my customers and their reading fans with respect when they talk about their books and writing,” he said.

    And authors have become Aleksy’s unofficial promoters, tauting Centuries & Sleuths to other writers and to members of the press, including during radio and TV interviews.

    “It was through Barbara D’Amato’s reference to our store that the late Stuart Kaminsky came here for a signing with his mother,” Aleksy said. “Some have even used my name or the store’s in their novels, or in the acknowledgement, for the help I’ve given. Some also have dedicated their books to myself and the store.”

    Authors also have brought Aleksy’s two most memorable experiences since owning Centuries & Sleuths – actor/humorist Steve Allen’s visit in 1992 and Sir Peter Ustinov in 1995.

    “It was so remarkable how both came at least 45 minutes before they were due, spoke to my son one-on-one when he was 8 and 11 years old, respectively. Although the ‘private’ conversation was entertaining they made sure of the time and said that ‘No one who comes to see me waits for me.’

    “Their discussions with the audience were fantastic and made you feel like they were on stage at Centuries & Sleuths. Both stayed until all their books were signed. They were both so professional and friendly. Many of our guest authors are like that, but these two individuals were of such stature . . . they didn’t forget their manners.”

    In addition to booksignings, Aleksy is known for scheduling innovative programs such as mock trials and debates.

    One of the store’s first events ever was “The Trial of Richard III” for the murder of his two nephews. A federal court judge, the neighbor of a customer, presided and brought his robes and gavel. Centuries & Sleuths did about 10 performances of that trial with more than 30 people in the audience each time. “The place was packed,” Aleksy fondly recalled.

    The store’s Mystery Discussion Group also has performed six mystery plays, five of which were written by members of the group.

    Among the store’s most popular events are the numerous “Meeting of Minds” programs similar to the PBS series.

    Aleksy had long been fascinated by Dutch writer and historian Henryk van Loon’s book in which a variety of historial figures would meet for dinner and discussions. When he was making up his business plan, Aleksy recalled that book and also how Steve Allen would have actors portray the likes of Attila the Hun, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther on his PBS series Meeting of Minds that aired during the 1970s. To date, the store has put on 17 Meeting of Minds with more than 50 historical characters such as Ben Franklin, Edward R. Morrow, Sir A.C. Doyle, Edgar Allen Poe, Agatha Christie, Dorothy L. Sayers, G.B. Shaw, Bram Stocker, W.E.B. Du Bois, and more.

    Again, Aleksy knows he can count on authors. “The authors will adjust their tight schedules to be here, or explain why they can’t make it.”

    Aleksy has plans for more events. He’d like to do a “Page to Screen,” comparing books to film adaptations and What’s Cooking in History & Mystery. But his next “big” brainstorm is a trivia contest between the History and Mystery Discussion Groups. “Both teams are pretty enthusiastic about the challenge. My wife, Tracy, and I have drawn up at least 50 questions in both categories, but we have to work on mechanics such as rules, time limits. But, my plans are to execute the first contest sometime around the Fourth of July. It always helps to have a deadline.”

    Times are tough for bookstores and the publishing industry, but Aleksy’s secrets to his succes are simple.

    “I am doing what I want, being creative, imaginative, not being too easily discouraged, having the almost perfect family to be in this business, being friendly and conciliatory as needed, stubborn and firm when necessary, having good customers and intelligent friends, being lucky, and working hard to keep my luck ‘good.’

    “I also am watching the bottom line and budget, but not letting it be the sole basis for my decision making. Consulting with smart people like my wife, my accountant and my attorney. But, realizing in all this, the ultimate plan and responsibility are mine.”

    Aleksy makes the bookstore business sound simple. Maybe too simple. Back in the mid-1990s, a man called to ask if Aleksy would buy his books since he was closing the bookstore he had opened in Melrose Park, Ill.

    The man said it was Aleksy’s fault he was closing.

    “Then he explained that he had been to our signing for Steve Allen and that he had a great time and that I made it look like so much fun and easy,” said Aleksy. “Therefore, I was responsible his leaving his job as an electrician and opening a bookstore that flopped. I said, ‘You should have spoken to me first.’ He said, ‘Ya, ya, ya!’ ”

    One of Britain’s most popular series is a Danish thriller that is the antithesis of a cop show.

    No car chases. No explosions. No serial killers. Cops make mistakes. A crime isn’t solved within an hour.

    The show is The Killing and this 20-part subtitled series has been a hit in Britain for the past four years mainly because its action unfolds slowly and deliberately, drawing in the viewer. Friends in Europe claim The Killing it is as addictive as HBO’s The Wire. For the record, the series originally was broadcast in Denmark under the name Forbrydelsen.

    Americans will finally get a chance to see what all the fuss is about when AMC’s 13-week version of The Killing debuts at 9 p.m. on April 3. Yes, this is the Americanized version so the dark tone will be a bit uplifted, but not by much. Remember, this is AMC, home of the deliciously dark series Mad Men.

    AMC had kept the action low-key, the atmosphere moody, and the emotion tapped-down. Like the original, each hour of AMC’s version will stand in for an entire day but the setting is now Seattle instead of Denmark. If that makes you remember the haunting Twin Peaks, I doubt it’s just a coincidence.

    Homicide detective Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) is ready to leave the job to get married. She's a single mom, ready to leave Seattle and move to Sonoma with her child and her soon-to-be husband. But on her last day of work, she is drawn into a new case about the disappearance of a teenage girl, Rosie Larsen. Mitch and Stan Larsen frantically try to track down their 17-year-old daughter when they learn she did not show up at school. The case leads Sarah and fellow detective Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman), who was to be her replacement, to Rosie’s school. The teenager’s disappearance also may affect the re-election of City Councilman Darren Richmond (Billy Campbell).

    The Killing’s quiet, thoughtful approach makes the investigation nightmarishly unnerving and utterly compelling. This is television to savor.

    The Killing will air on Sundays at 9 p.m. EST on AMC.

    PHOTO: Detectives Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman) and Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) in The Killing. AMC photo

    One of Britain’s most popular series is a Danish thriller that is the antithesis of a cop show.

    No car chases. No explosions. No serial killers. Cops make mistakes. A crime isn’t solved within an hour.

    The show is The Killing and this 20-part subtitled series has been a hit in Britain for the past four years mainly because its action unfolds slowly and deliberately, drawing in the viewer. Friends in Europe claim The Killing it is as addictive as HBO’s The Wire. For the record, the series originally was broadcast in Denmark under the name Forbrydelsen.

    Americans will finally get a chance to see what all the fuss is about when AMC’s 13-week version of The Killing debuts at 9 p.m. on April 3. Yes, this is the Americanized version so the dark tone will be a bit uplifted, but not by much. Remember, this is AMC, home of the deliciously dark series Mad Men.

    AMC had kept the action low-key, the atmosphere moody, and the emotion tapped-down. Like the original, each hour of AMC’s version will stand in for an entire day but the setting is now Seattle instead of Denmark. If that makes you remember the haunting Twin Peaks, I doubt it’s just a coincidence.

    Homicide detective Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) is ready to leave the job to get married. She's a single mom, ready to leave Seattle and move to Sonoma with her child and her soon-to-be husband. But on her last day of work, she is drawn into a new case about the disappearance of a teenage girl, Rosie Larsen. Mitch and Stan Larsen frantically try to track down their 17-year-old daughter when they learn she did not show up at school. The case leads Sarah and fellow detective Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman), who was to be her replacement, to Rosie’s school. The teenager’s disappearance also may affect the re-election of City Councilman Darren Richmond (Billy Campbell).

    The Killing’s quiet, thoughtful approach makes the investigation nightmarishly unnerving and utterly compelling. This is television to savor.

    The Killing will air on Sundays at 9 p.m. EST on AMC.

    PHOTO: Detectives Stephen Holder (Joel Kinnaman) and Sarah Linden (Mireille Enos) in The Killing. AMC photo

    Books to make you smile, giggle, chuckle, laugh, smirk, and howl.

    I’m a huge fan of humorous crime fiction. Some of the books I enjoy are laugh-out-loud funny on every page, some of them not so obviously humorous, and some of them are downright dark and warped and I’m a sick, twisted person for laughing. So here are some of the perhaps lesser known or less established humorous authors and books that tickle my funny bone while thrilling me with tales of murder and mayhem.

    Molly BrownInvitation to a Funeral
    The setting is London in the 1670s and playwright Aphra Behn is in financial difficulties. Her last play was a donkey, and in her current play, she’s coping with the world’s worst actress, who just happens to be the mistress of the drunken, debauched and thoroughly wicked Earl of Rochester. As if that wasn’t enough, she decides to investigate the murders of two brothers she used to know. Bawdy and brilliant—a real Restoration romp.

    Sean DoolittleDirt
    Quince Bishop is having a bad day. It starts out pretty grim when he has to attend his good friend Martin’s funeral and it goes downhill from there. Literally. When a group of masked environmental activists gatecrash the funeral, one of them lands in the hole on top of Martin’s casket. Stir in a dodgy funeral director, a pair of ex-cons, and a convention for morticians, and you have a noir caper that made me laugh and made me cry—sometimes both on the same page. Sad, touching and bloody good fun.

    Eric GarciaAnonymous Rex
    Vincent Rubio is a private eye who is addicted to basil. He’s also a velociraptor.What normal people don’t know is that the dinosaurs faked their extinction millions of years ago and are walking amongst us, cleverly disguised in latex suits. Pass me the basil—I want some of what Eric Garcia is having. This book had me going to work wondering which of my colleagues was a triceratops. Eric Garcia has created a bizarre yet oddly believable concept. More than that he has created a charming, imaginative and funny PI.

    Victor GischlerGun Monkeys
    Charlie Swift is a hardworking, loyal, efficient employee. The fact that his employer is one of Florida’s top mobsters is beside the point. Up until the start of this book, Charlie is quite happy with his job—making sure things run smoothly, taking home a decent paycheck, and tidying away the odd dead body. Unfortunately, things start to go slightly awry from page one. Charlie’s driving around with a headless body in the trunk of his car and from there on, the bodies start to pile up so quickly that he’d need a U-Haul to transport them by the end of the book.

    Allan GuthrieTwo-Way Split
    A simple, heartwarming, noir tale of a post office robbery gone wrong, an unfaithful wife, a couple of psychopaths (at least), a pair of seedy PIs, and an ex-con who really loves his mother—Two-Way Split is a book which takes that noir finger of fate, gleefully pokes you in the eye with it and then hands you your eyeball back, just for fun. Dark, warped, violent. Every character is superbly drawn and compellingly believable (although, in several cases, you wish they weren’t). I laughed on numerous occasions, and then worried about what that said about me.

    Mark Haskell SmithMoist
    If I tried to give a brief synopsis of this book a) you wouldn’t believe me and b) it would make absolutely no sense whatsoever. Let’s just say there are a couple of tattooed arms without bodies, one tattooed man missing an arm, a masturbation coach, assorted mobsters, sex, drugs and. oh. a bit more sex. This book was completely bizarre, over the top, funny and. well. moist. Highly recommended to those whose favourite word is “warped.”

    Chris NilesHell’s Kitchen
    Apartment hunting can be murder. Millionaire Cyrus has a big gap in his life that all the money in the world can’t fill. Until the day he accidentally shoplifts a self-help book and discovers that The Master has a message for him. And the message is “Cyrus, you need to become a serial killer.” Cyrus is fulfilled at last. He lures desperate apartment hunters to their grisly ends. A very funny book with some great satire and one liners. Hell’s Kitchen has its tongue firmly in cheek and the rest of the body parts neatly tucked away in the fridge.

    Scott PhillipsCottonwood
    It’s 1873 in the burgeoning frontier town of Cottonwood, Kansas. Cottonwood is a town where the men are men, and so are most of the women. As the town grows, so does sin and crime (and, heaven knows, it was never a sinless town to start off with). Cottonwood is a frontier town where nothing is done in half measure—sex, drinking, and “killin’ those as needs killin’” (and a good few who don’t) are the main pastimes for the town’s bawdy, brash, and brazen residents. And in the midst of all the normal sorts of sin, solitary travellers seem to be disappearing, never to be heard from again. Is there a serial killer at loose in Cottonwood? Cottonwood is base and earthy and darkly comic. It’s not so much Little House on the Prairie as Little Whorehouse on the Prairie.

    Mike RipleyAngel Hunt
    Fitzroy Maclean Angel—cab-driving, trumpet-playing PI in London—is house sitting when someone drops in—quite literally—through the bathroom skylight. Dead. Oh, and by chance, it turns out to be an old friend of Angel’s. Angel is a great character—a rascally charmer who loves booze and birds with equal enthusiasm. Politically incorrect, sardonic, and witty.

    Ray ShannonFirecracker
    Reece Germaine is a successful, independent businesswoman who runs her own PR agency. She’s also eight months pregnant following a wild Vegas weekend. The father is Dallas Cowboys football star Raygene Price who has a soft heart and a soft head—a dangerous combination when you’re worth a lot of money. Raygene dispenses love with indiscriminate and fertile abandon. Reece is not the only woman who Raygene has impregnated—but she’s probably the only one who’s not looking to take him for every penny he’s got. A fast and furious comedic thriller.

    Keith SnyderCoffin’s Got the Dead Guy on the Inside
    Jason Keltner is doing what he loves to do best—composing and playing music. OK, so his regular gigs don’t pay much, he’s struggling with his latest composition—“Unnamed #23,” and the rent on the dilapidated boarding house he calls home is overdue. He’s contemplating getting away for a while to finish his composition when the mysterious Norton Platt turns up with an offer Jason can’t refuse—despite his best efforts. Platt wants to hire Jason to babysit Paul Reno, a former friend of Jason’s who appears to be involved in some shady deals. Confusion, computer chips, car chases, and comedy. A wonderfully sprightly humorous book.

    Mark SullivanCorned Beef Sandwich
    A really funny and sweet book. Minimal crime but maximum fun. The main premise of the book is a holdup gone awry, the wrong person ends up with the loot and the baddies want it back. But there’s far more to it including a goth protagonist, a halal corned beef sandwich, and some goldfish with really weird names. If Donald Westlake had been born in Manchester and listened to Marilyn Manson, he could well have written this book. Instead, Corned Beef Sandwich is author Mark Sullivan’s first novel, and very enjoyable it is too. Reservoir Goldfish. This is a really good read—completely original, charmingly scruffy and has that real feel-good factor. It’s also the only time I’ve ever found corned beef appealing.

    Duane SwierczynskiThe Wheelman
    Swierczynski’s Lennon drives cars for the bad guys. He’s also mute following a nasty meeting with a bullet in a previous robbery. He should have taken that as a cue to get out of the robbery business, but no. Instead he takes part in a bank robbery which nets him and his co-conspirators $650,000. Things, as they are wont to do in noir fiction, turn from bad to really, really bad. Lennon is beaten, shot, and stuffed down a drainage pipe. Meanwhile, the body count rises around him. Over the top (in a very, very good way), action packed, violent, and funny, with a plot as convoluted and stuffed full of twists, turns, and shocks as. well. a drainage pipe stuffed full of bodies.

    John WelterNight of the Avenging Blowfish
    A humorous thriller love story, featuring a Secret Service agent looking for love, happiness, and a covert baseball game against the CIA. His job is to protect the president. From what is never quite clear, although it seems to have something to do with protecting him from eating Spam. Funny and gentle and touching.

    Charlie WilliamsDeadfolk
    Royston Blake is a big man in Mangel—what with being head doorman of Hoppers and driving a clapped-out Ford Capri and all, but there are rumours that he’s lost his bottle. And that’s not good. Not good at ALL. They’re worse than the rumours that he might have killed his wife. Blake is someone that, on the face of it, is not easy to like. He’s violent, drinks too much, and you wouldn’t really want to be his girlfriend, but he sort of sneaks up on you and worms his way into your heart like a slightly lost and endearing tapeworm. Deadfolk is violent, bloody, hilarious, touching. It has a bizarre but brilliant plot, outrageous characters, a wonderfully original voice, and a chainsaw called Susan. Demented, deranged, and totally, utterly delicious.

    Brian WiprudSleep With the Fishes
    When Sid ‘Sleep’ Bifulco (so called because he puts his victims to sleep before he whacks them—it's tidier that way) rats out the Palfutti family, he tells the FBI to stuff their witness protection program and comes to an arrangement with a rival mob family. In prison he develops a passion for fishing (which he learns without the aid of water, or fish for that matter) and, on his release, he retires from the wiseguy life to pursue some quiet fishing in Hellbender Eddy. Only it doesn’t quite work out that way. There are some sharks circling, and none of them have gills. This book is a hilarious caper—fish, porn, and two guys named Bob. It’s an offer you can’t refuse.

    So there you have it—some quiet and quirky, some rambunctious and rowdy. From cosy to noir, amateur sleuth to police procedural to hardboiled PI, humor can be found in all subgenres of crime fiction. As Mel Brooks once said, “Tragedy is when I cut my finger. Comedy is when you walk into an open sewer and die.” Thank heavens for those who walk into open sewers and die.

    Donna Moore is the author of Go to Helena Handbasket (PointBlank Press, 2006), a crime-fiction spoof and the 2007 winner of the Lefty Award for most humorous crime novel. Her latest novel is Old Dogs (Busted Flush Press, 2010). She lives in Scotland.

    This article first appeared in Mystery SceneSpring Issue #99.


    Contents

    Dosas originated in South India their exact birthplace in that region is a matter of conjecture. [1] In ancient times the millets were the staple food of South Indian region and not the paddy/rice. From ancient literature, scriptures and stone edicts it can be found that the rice originated from Ancient Tamilakam. The ancient Chola Nadu region is known to be the rice bowl. Most of the present day dishes like idli, dosai, appam, pittu/puttu are referenced in the ancient Tamil Sangam literature. Rice based dishes spread to rest of the South Indian region from Tamilakam. According to food historian K. T. Achaya, dosa (as dosai) was already in use in the ancient Tamil country around the 1st century AD, as per references in the Sangam literature. [2] According to historian P. Thankappan Nair, dosa originated in the Udupi town of present-day Karnataka. [3] [4]

    In popular tradition, the origin of the dosa is linked to Udupi, probably because of the dish's association with the Udupi restaurants. [1] Also, the original Tamil dosai was softer and thicker. The thinner and crispier version of dosai was first made in present-day Karnataka. [5] A recipe for dosa (as dosaka) can be found in Manasollasa, a 12th-century Sanskrit encyclopedia compiled by the Chalukya king Someshvara III, who ruled from present-day Karnataka. [6]

    After the Independence of India, South Indian cuisine became gradually popular in the North. In Delhi the Madras Hotel [7] in Connaught Place became a landmark that was one of the first restaurants to serve South Indian cuisine. [8] It arrived in Mumbai with the Udupi restaurants in the 1930s. [9]

    Dosa is the Anglicized name of a variety of South Indian names for the dish, for example dosai in Tamil, dose in Kannada and dosha in Malayalam.

    The standard transliterations and pronunciations of the word in various South Indian languages are as follows:

    Language Transliteration Pronunciation (IPA)
    Kannada: ದೋಸೆ dōse [d̪oːse]
    Malayalam: ദോശ dōśa [d̪oːɕa]
    Tamil: தோசை dōsai [t̪oːsʌj]
    Telugu: దోస [10] dōsa [d̪oːse]

    Dosa is high in carbohydrates and contains no added sugars or saturated fats. As its key ingredients are rice and black gram, it is also a good source of protein. [11] One home made plain dosa without oil contains about 112 calories, of which 84% is carbohydrate and 16% protein. [12] The fermentation process increases the vitamin B and vitamin C content. [13] There are instant mix products for making dosa which usually contain higher levels of rice.

    A mixture of rice and black gram that has been soaked in water is ground finely to form a batter. Some add a handful of soaked fenugreek seeds. The proportion of rice to lentils is generally 3:1 or 4:1. The batter is allowed to ferment overnight, before being mixed with water to get the desired consistency. The batter is then ladled onto a hot tava (griddle) greased with oil or ghee (clarified butter). It is spread out with the base of a ladle or bowl to form a pancake. It can be made either to be thick like a pancake, or thin and crispy. A dosa is served hot, either folded in half or rolled like a wrap. It is usually served with chutney and sambar. The mixture of black grams and rice can be replaced with highly refined wheat flour or semolina.


    History and Reconstructions of 10 Ancient Structures You Should Know About

    Credit: Virtual World Heritage Laboratory

    Posted By: Dattatreya Mandal February 26, 2018

    Previously, we had talked about the animated reconstructions of ancient cities. Well, this time around, we have decided to shift the focus on individual structures and buildings of ancient history, ranging from temples, villas to palaces – with the recreations being made by the concerted efforts of researchers, historians and animators. So without further ado, let us take a gander at ten animated reconstructions of ancient structures you should know about.

    1) Solomon’s Temple (possibly 10th century BC) –

    Source: 4kingdoms.com

    An almost 3,000-year old grand yet lost temple or a just a figment of religious fable? Solomon’s Temple or the First Jewish Temple has raised debates for centuries over its mere existence. According to Biblical traditions, the massive ancient religious structure mentioned with incredible details was the centerpiece of the so-called Jerusalem sanctuary and was erected on the humongous man-made plateau by around 960 BC (according to conventional sources). Taking the slightly more ‘sensational’ route, Solomon’s Temple was also the chosen building that supposedly housed the Ark of the Covenant. Unfortunately, archaeology has still not been able to reveal much about the presence of any such ancient monument. Moreover, in our current circumstances, political affairs play a big role – with the Temple Mount (the aforementioned man-made plateau) ‘also’ hosting what is considered as the oldest extant Islamic architectural specimen of the world – the Dome of the Rock (or Qubbat As-Sakhrah).

    In any case, the ultimate purpose of this article is NOT to debate the existence (or lack thereof) of Solomon’s Temple. We rather wanted to demonstrate how the Temple of King Solomon might have looked like if it was actually constructed in accordance with the measurements mentioned in Biblical sources. In the video below, Daniel Smith has concocted a nifty 3D animation in SketchUp 2016 that demonstrates both the exterior and interior of the religious structure. All his virtual measurements were taken in accordance with the figures mentioned in 1 Kings 6-7.

    2) Hanging Gardens of Babylon (circa 7th – 6th century BC) –

    Source: SWebDesign

    Myth, history, and magnificence – the Hanging Gardens of Babylon tread the fine line between all these avenues to emerge as one of Herodotus’ Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. And while the name itself evokes a reverie of a colossal construction with lush greenery complemented by the kaleidoscopic bevy of flowers and herbs, unfortunately, there is very little archaeological evidence to support the presumed massive scale of these ‘hanging’ gardens from ancient Mesopotamia. In any case, the folks over at Lumion 3D have given a go at virtually reconstructing this nigh mythical monument from antiquity – and the results are quite breathtaking, to say the least (albeit with a few artistic licenses).

    And in yet another twist to this tale from history, according to Dr. Stephanie Dalley, an honorary research fellow at Oxford University’s Oriental Institute, the Hanging Gardens of the ancient world were real. But the researcher asserts that the entire monumental scope with its enviable lushness was not even located in Babylon. Dalley made a comparative analysis of quite a few ancient cuneiform texts, and her conclusion is that the Hanging Gardens were constructed in the early 7th century BC, 300 miles north of Babylon, in the Assyrian royal city of Nineveh. Some of the translations allude to Sennacherib as the one who might have commanded the massive building project for his own palatial complex. Few texts with the Assyrian angle also mentioned the use of water-raising screws made of bronze that might have functioned in a similar manner to the renowned Archimedes Screw.

    3) Second Temple of Jerusalem (circa late 6th century BC) –

    Reconstruction of Jerusalem and the Temple of Herod. Illustration by James Tissot, French, 1836-1902. Source: Brooklyn Museum

    There are very few historical ruins in the world that have held up their legacy so much so that they still play a significant role in the cultural consciousness of the people. The Second Temple of Jerusalem (or simply the Second Temple) undoubtedly belongs to this rare category of historical structures. And while the inconspicuous remnants of both this ancient temple complex and its possible predecessor – Solomon’s Temple (or First Temple), are confined to the perimeters of the present-day Temple Mount, the animation presented below virtually reconstructs the magnificent building in its Herodian iteration.

    According to the Israel Archaeology YouTube channel, which is a part of the Friends of the Israel Antiquities Authority organization –

    The Herodian version of the model shows visitors how excavators believe the Temple Mount site appeared prior to its destruction by Roman troops in the year 70 AD. The focus is on the southern portion of the enclosure, and includes reconstructions of Robinson’s Arch (an early overpass linking the top of the platform with the major city street below), the Hulda Street gates and passages onto the platform, the Royal Stoa, and the Second Temple. The reconstruction is based on the excavations at the Temple Mount under the direction of Ronny Reich and regional archeologist Gideon Avni.

    4) Temple Complex of Philae (circa 4th century BC) –

    Philae Temple – painting by David Roberts 1838.

    Often thought of as the last active refuge of the native ancient Egyptian religion, the island temple complex of Philae (or Pilak, meaning ‘the end’ or ‘boundary’) was originally located near the massive First Cataract of the Nile in Upper Egypt. Probably comprising two islands, the conglomerate site of Philae (1,500 by 490 ft) was mythically related to the burial place of god Osiris – thus making it an important pilgrimage center for both Egyptians and the Nubians. Building upon this ambit of reverence, the later Egyptians, Greeks (Ptolemaic dynasty), and even Romans furnished their fair share of architectural features – which collectively translated to the magnificent ancient Egyptian island temple complex of Philae.

    It should be noted that presently the Philae complex is not situated in its original location, with the proximate areas being flooded by the Aswan Low Dam in 1902. Fortunately, by virtue of the ambitious 9-year long UNESCO Nubia Campaign project in 1970 (before the construction of Aswan High Dam), the temple complex was dismantled stone-by-stone and reassembled precisely in its current location – the nearby Agilkia Island that most resembles its ancient counterpart. However, going down the history lane, in the following animation, the resourceful folks over at Altair4 Multimedia have reconstructed the sheer scale and size of the original Philae, along with the vibrant recreation of the interior of the main Temple of Isis.

    5) Villa of Augustus (circa 1st century BC) –

    Tradition has it that the so-called ‘Villa of Augustus’, also known as the Dionysiac Villa in Somma Vesuviana, near Nola (an ancient Campanian town in Naples) was the place where Emperor Augustus breathed his last, circa 14 AD. Now while from the scholarly perspective this claim is debatable, there is no doubt about the archaeological eminence of the site. Now interestingly enough, a recent discovery has rather reinforced the architectural ambit of the Dionysiac Villa. To that end, researchers as part of a collaborative effort from Benincasa University in Naples and the University of Tokyo, have found a massive cistern within the complex that boasts almost 300 sq m (or 3,200 sq ft) in area, with its impressive 30 m length and 10 m width.

    According to archaeologist Antonio De Simone, the cistern structure covered by dual walkways was built to salvage water from the nearby mountains. The collected water, in turn, was also used to supply the proximate farmland. Quite intriguingly, in spite of the mystery of its ownership, the villa itself was spared from the wrath of Vesuvius’ eruption in 79 AD (though there are samples of volcanic deposits within the complex). As a result, the villa was possibly being continuously used as a large farmhouse (aided by the functioning cistern) until it was finally destroyed by another baleful eruption of Vesuvius in 472 AD.

    In any case, it is once more the folks over at Altair4 Multimedia who have virtually reconstructed the ‘Villa of Augustus’, based upon the extant remnants of the substantially large structure. And the end result is glorious to behold, standing as a testament to ancient Roman art and architecture.

    6) Upper-Class House of Pompeii (circa 1st century AD) –

    Photo: F. Tronchin/Warren, Peristyle, Casa della Venere in Conchiglia, Pompeii, BY-NC-ND 2.0

    Researchers have been able to recreate an ancient Roman domus (house) inside Pompeii that existed before the natural disaster of 79 AD. Envisaged as a continuation of the Swedish Pompeii Project (now overseen by Sweden’s Lund University), the ‘authentic’ reconstruction project was led by archaeologists Anne-Marie Leander Touati – with the experts utilizing 3D scanning and even drone technologies.

    The domus we see here belonged to one Caecilius Iucundus, a wealthy banker from Pompeii who lived almost 2,000 years ago. The house was located in the city block termed as Insula V1, which was thoroughly analyzed by 3D scanning and drones (conducted during fieldwork expeditions between 2011 and 2012). The site itself was chosen because of its ‘prime’ location at the crossing of two of Pompeii’s main thoroughfares. Suffice it to say, the neighborhood with its easy access to the city’s commercial facilities translates to the affluence of Iucundus and the opulence of his house.

    Now while we fleetingly mentioned the authentic scope of this reconstruction, the accuracy of the project is confirmed when it comes to the decorative elements, given their preserved nature in Pompeii as evidenced by archaeological surveys. On the other hand, the actual architecture of the domus is obviously based on speculative factors, though bolstered by the known style and arrangements of spatial elements used during Roman times.

    7) Domus Aurea (circa 64 AD) –

    Credit: Altair4 Multimedia.

    Beyond the ambit of military triumphs, the Romans were known for both their architectural and engineering prowess. And sometimes such scopes of expertise even reached obsessive and (we daresay) ‘decadent’ levels. The Domus Aurea (or Golden House) aptly harks back to this progress of Roman building skills in terms of excessive magnificence. Designed as a large landscaped portico villa, the expansive project (patronized by Emperor Nero) was started in 64 AD, after the Great Fire of Rome had destroyed many of the aristocratic and civic buildings – especially on the slopes of the Palatine Hill. Given such ‘extremes’ of circumstances and results, Altair4 Multimedia has given a go at reconstructing the entire monumental structure with the use of some fascinating 3D rendering techniques.

    This animated video mainly deals with the magnificent external features of the Domus Aurea. The latter part of the video superimposes the Colosseum on the water body that flanked the ancient ‘villa’ on one side. This is because the massive amphitheater was rather built on a site that previously catered to Nero’s artificial lake by his Golden house.

    The second animated video gives us a quick tour through the ritzy interiors of the Domus Aurea. And we move to the last part of the video, it curiously shows flower petals being showered from the rooftop. For more information on that interesting ‘feature’, please refer to the third point in the article below.

    8) Colosseum (circa 70 – 80 AD) –

    Blood, dust, sands, and glory – these are the words that come to mind when traversing the pop cultural landscape of the Colosseum. However from the architectural perspective, unlike other ancient theaters, the oval-shaped, freestanding amphitheater was a Roman invention. And, as the jewel in the crown of such imposing Roman-made architectural specimens, the Colosseum holds its head high with the towering elliptical tiers that rise to 180 ft (55 m) from the heart of the ‘eternal city’. From those very seats, the ‘bloodthirsty’ audience watched on the impeccably choreographed mock battles, exotic animal parades and their merciless slaughtering, and the gruesome gladiatorial fights.

    But as far as history goes, there was more to this exalted arena, than just the collective ancient display of viciousness and pomp. To that end, being elliptical in plan, the Colosseum is 189 m (615 ft) long, and 156 m (510 ft) wide – which accounts for almost 500 m (1,640 ft) in circumference, with a base area of 6 acres (258,000 sq ft – the equivalent of more than four American football fields). The inner arena is similarly oval, with a length of 87 m (287 ft) and width of 55 m (180 ft) while being surrounded by a 5 m (16 ft) high wall on all sides – after which the seat tiers started. As we mentioned before, these tiers ultimately rose to a height of 180 ft (55 m) – thus making the total volume of the Italian amphitheater a whopping 1,320,000 cubic m or 47 million cubic ft. So, it comes as no surprise that during peak events, the Colosseum could account for more than 50,000 spectators.

    To that end, the folks over at Colosseum Lives (check their website) have concocted a 3D video from the VR perspective (using Oculus Rift), and it aptly presents a grandiose scope of the Colosseum, accompanied by good commentary.

    9) Hadrian’s Villa (circa 117 – 134 AD) –

    Credit: Virtual World Heritage Laboratory

    Interestingly enough, one of the greatest architectural marvels of the ancient Roman empire in its apical stage (in 2nd century AD), was not actually constructed within the actual city of Rome. We are of course talking about Villa Adriana or Hadrian’s Villa, a grandiosely conceived scope that fused architecture, sculptures, landscaping and natural resources available in the local area. Situated in present-day Tivoli, the magnificent retreat is located 28 km (17.4 m) away from Rome, and it was originally constructed between 117 – 134 AD.

    Now from the perspective of the sheer area encompassed by the Hadrian’s Villa complex, the term ‘villa’ doesn’t really do it justice. That is because by-and-large, Hadrian’s Villa was an imperial palace (for at least Emperor Hadrian from 128 AD till the end of his life in 138 AD) with Rome’s large court living on the expansive grounds all throughout the year. And other than just the ambit of the palace, Hadrian’s Villa flaunted an assortment of architectural and sculptural specimens that went beyond conventional spatial elements to morph into strikingly opulent displays, ranging from theaters, libraries, round pools, dining halls, baths to even a private ‘island’ of sorts that housed the emperor’s private studio. All of these translate to over 30 buildings inside a massive complex of around 250 acres, with the constructions proudly showcasing different architectural orders, including classical Greek and Egyptian styles.

    The fabulously contrived animation below showcases these architectural elements (along with many others) of the Hadrian’s Villa in their crisp 3D rendered details. The video was created by The Digital Hadrian’s Villa Project, an endeavor undertaken by the Virtual World Heritage Laboratory.

    And in case you want even more details on the Hadrian’s Villa, you can also take a gander at the video below (created by Khan Academy) that provides a virtual tour through the various parts of the Hadrian’s Villa compound, accompanied by commentary made by Dr. Bernard Frischer, the overseer of the Rome Reborn project.

    10) Palace of Galerius (circa early 4th century AD) –

    Source: MixaniTouXponoy

    Thessaloniki, while being the second largest city of present-day Greece, is also considered as the cultural capital of the country. In part, this honorable status is fueled by the historical legacy of the urban center that was founded way back around 315 BC by King Cassander of Macedon, by uniting the conglomeration of around 27 big and small settlements. By the time of the Roman period, Thessaloniki was one of the rare free cities of the Republic, and the commercial hub was later transformed into the largest city of the Greek provinces during the Empire period. Following such a favorable administrative trend, in 3rd century AD, when the Roman Empire was divided into the tetrarchy, Galerius Maximianus Caesar finally made Thessaloniki his sole capital city. And thus came forth the founding of various architectural projects, including a palace, a new hippodrome, a triumphal arch and even an imposing mausoleum.

    The impressive (and massive) Palace of Galerius was originally built along the north-south axis, and comprised of different structural elements, including the Rotonda, the aforementioned hippodrome, the Octagon and the famous Triumphant Arch (Kamara). As for the main palace itself, the imposing building boasted two separate floors, constructed around a central courtyard (atrium), thus essentially pertaining to a peristyle. The spatial scope consisted of richly decorated mosaic floors, statues and long corridors with huge volumes reserved for the emperor, palace guards, and courts. The eastern side further showcased its two-storied gallery interspersed with fountains.

    The following animation was contrived by graphic designer Vladimir Nefidis. The 3D virtual reconstruction is based on the actual archaeological finds and aerial photography related to the Palace of Galerius.

    And in case we have not attributed or misattributed any image, artwork or photograph, we apologize in advance. Please let us know via the ‘Contact Us’ link, provided both above the top bar and at the bottom bar of the page.


    Introduction

    According to Greek mythology, before we were born, high above the clouds, the three Moirai spun thread on a spindle to determine our fate. As the goddesses of life and death, ancient Greeks entrusted them with ensuring that a mortal’s destiny would be fulfilled, as granted by the universe. Without contention, our time on Earth was decided at birth.

    When a pregnancy enters its ninth month, the goddesses are called. Clotho spins the thread, Lachesis measures its length and with “abhorred shears,” Atropos severs it at exactly the point the new life should end. They uphold a single goal: to maintain law and order among the mortal and divine. Their verdict is written in the stars and is not to be altered, squashing all hope of everlasting life. The foolish who try are pursued by Furies, the deities of vengeance.

    And that is that. We get what we get. For some, the end is abrupt. A quick, unforeseen final breath. For others, the thread wears thin, either from disease or hardship, gradually weakening with the passing of time. But a single thread does not exist alone. It falls to Earth and weaves into the fabric of life, integral to its pattern until Atropos makes that fateful snip.


    Een Oorlog Reeds Verloren

    De financiële wereld verkeert in roerige tijden. Terwijl de printers van de centrale banken overuren draaien (brrrr) om de enorme schade die de coronamaatregelen hebben veroorzaakt op te vangen, duidelijke signalen van inflatie inmiddels in meerdere markten zichtbaar worden en er wereldwijd wordt geschermd met het vooruitzicht van digitaal centralebankgeld krijgt Sven uit alle hoeken dezelfde vraag voor zijn kiezen: "Hoe zit het met de huizenmarkt?"

    Wat is er allemaal gaande, hoe hangt dit samen en waar gaat het heen? Zonder financieringsmarkt geen huizenmarkt Sven zet de verschillende ontwikkelingen op een rijtje en beschouwt het geldsysteem voor wat het is: een juridische fictie, die hoognodig toe is aan herziening.

    Links:
    Leonardo DiCaprio 'The Wolf of Wall Street'1 THR Interview!: https://youtu.be/nCbrN6svWRw
    ‘Steeds meer mensen zijn overbodig’: https://www.groene.nl/artikel/steeds-meer-mensen-zijn-overbodig
    Nobody Knows How to Interpret This Doomsday Stonehenge in Georgia: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/nobody-knows-how-to-interpret-this-doomsday-stonehenge-in-georgia-5592082/
    Thread. Blackrock is buying every single family house they can find: https://twitter.com/APhilosophae/status/1402434266970140676?s=08
    ygty#2.07: Requiem voor de vrijheid: https://youtu.be/fNXnGcSyo44
    Overheidszaken en de stand van zaken (met Jordy Zwarts) | #3.24: https://youtu.be/keCaMBtKOcA
    Op waarde gemunt: in gesprek met Milo | #3.29: https://youtu.be/8oLY6RAbDgs
    Over de digitale Euro en de toekomst van geld: https://youtu.be/hO8KCbOh3oY

    Studio ingericht met dank aan: https://cd-rek.nl/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Bij het vallen des avonds | #3.31

    De zomer is gearriveerd en de wurggreep waarin de overheid het land heeft gehouden wordt langzaam maar zeker losgelaten. Velen zijn ervan overtuigd dat wij ons in de staart van de coronacrisis bevinden, dat het einde nu toch écht in zicht in en dat de crisis en repressie van de afgelopen anderhalf jaar spoedig nog slechts een herinnering zullen zijn die met de dag verder weg raakt. En dat alles misschien wel ondanks gemaakte fouten in het beleid, maar toch echt dankzij de massale vaccinaties.

    Anderen durven dat te betwijfelen. Zij betwijfelen hoe lang de versoepeling zal voortduren (voor welke variant moeten we komend seizoen bang zijn?), maken zich zorgen over welke maatregelen nooit meer zullen verdwijnen (heeft u al eens ingelogd op mijn.rivm.nl?) en zijn aanzienlijk minder overtuigd door de vaccinatiepropaganda dan hun vakantiebeluste landgenoten (als er geen langetermijneffecten zijn, dan is het vaccin toch ook niet effectief?).

    Sven deelt zijn overpeinzingen aan het kampvuur en maakt van de gelegenheid gebruik om, in het schemerlicht van een ongewisse toekomst, het glas met u te heffen.

    Links:
    Waarom wij geen eieren leggen: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1vpbtF73d-Akc7LMd2khBhWPhcedTbs9F/view?usp=sharing
    (Originele link: https://www.nrc.nl/nieuws/2005/04/30/waarom-wij-geen-eieren-leggen-10489731-a672754#:

    :text=En%20de%20mens%20sterft%20uit,kan%20geen%20eieren%20meer%20leggen.)
    Gesetz zur Verhütung und Bekämpfung von Infektionskrankheiten beim Menschen (Infektionsschutzgesetz - IfSG) § 21 Impfstoffe: https://www.gesetze-im-internet.de/ifsg/__21.html#Seitenanfang
    Protection against Infection Act (Infektionsschutzgesetz, IfSG): https://germanlawarchive.iuscomp.org/?p=2487
    Raëlisme: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ra%C3%ABlisme

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Slimme steden, bezorgde burgers | #3.30

    Met de komst van het 5G-netwerk, het 'internet of things' en de belofte van 'smart cities' gaat de wereld als men de propaganda van overheden, providers en fabrikanten mag geloven een utopische toekomst tegemoet. Wat er doorgaans echter niét bij wordt verteld is dat met dezelfde middelen een totalitaire surveillancemaatschappij verwezenlijkt kan worden.

    Sven ontving een uitnodiging om op de koffie te komen bij een volger die de tijd en moeite had genomen om eens in de techniek achter de vernieuwde straatverlichting te duiken. Zijn bevindingen zijn allesbehalve utopisch en doen sterk denken aan de technieken voor crowd control zoals al eerder in de Tweede Kamer aangekondigd door Mona Keijzer. Welke gevaren veroorzaakt de grootschalige uitrol van deze techniek voor de privacy en de volksgezondheid? En is dat allemaal nog wel duurzaam te noemen?

    Als u mee wilt helpen informatie in te winnen bij uw gemeente middels een WOB-verzoek, of met een brief aan fabrikant Philips, download u dan onderstaande brieven en verzend deze na het invullen en ondertekenen naar de betreffende partij(en).

    Links:
    United States Patent No.: US 6,506,148 B2: https://patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/e2/4e/f9/3d4d57e738f8c2/US6506148.pdf
    Envisioning the future of healthcare through wearable technology: https://www.usa.philips.com/healthcare/innovation/research-and-exploration/als-mind-control
    Mona Keijzer (staatssecretaris EZK) over 5G en de inzet van crowd control: https://youtu.be/cuui8jAITLI
    Life Inside China's Total Surveillance State: https://youtu.be/OQ5LnY21Hgc
    Moscow Signal: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moscow_Signal
    HEALTH EFFECTS OF MICROWAVE RADIATION: WHAT THE “MOSCOW SIGNAL” REVEALED: https://blog.degruyter.com/health-effects-microwave-radiation-moscow-signal/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Op waarde gemunt: in gesprek met Milo | #3.29

    Terwijl de printers van de centrale banken nog steeds overuren draaien om de wereldeconomie overeind te houden zijn de welgestelden van de wereld in rep en roer om hun vermogens veilig te stellen. Of het nu gaat om vastgoed, aandelen, crypto of edelmetalen, ze vliegen als warme broodjes over de toonbank.

    Sven nodigde oude bekende Milo, de goud- en zilverhandelaar die inmiddels ook zijn eigen kanaal heeft, uit om de stand van zaken in de financiële markten uit de doeken te doen. Een uitnodiging die Milo zoals gewoonlijk niet met lege handen kwam beantwoorden.

    Voor wie Milo wil volgen en/of met hem in contact wil komen:
    https://www.youtube.com/c/GoudEnMuntPunt
    [email protected]
    06 200 58 090

    Overige links:
    https://www.kitco.com/
    The US Government's Trillion Dollar Coin: https://youtu.be/rIFfa8Pn9nU
    Goede tijden, Gouden tijden: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2020/12/26/goede-tijden-gouden-tijden/
    Een Koers Reeds Gereden: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2020/08/30/een-koers-reeds-gereden-1/
    Als gelouterd goud en zuiver zilver: in gesprek met Milo: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2020/07/22/als-gelouterd-goud-en-zuiver-zilver-in-gesprek-met-milo/

    Studio ingericht met dank aan: https://cd-rek.nl/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Incompetentie in casu | #3.28

    De politiek, de rechtspraak en de medische wetenschap vormen als het op de coronamaatregelen aankomt samen een blok om deze te verdedigen. De een dekt de ander en mensen met kritiek worden onder hen van het kastje naar de muur gestuurd. Nu is dat niet verwonderlijk en sterker nog: in een gezonde democratische rechtsstaat zou men het niet anders willen.

    Echter verkeert Nederland, net als de rest van de wereld, in een heel andere situatie. Na ruim een jaar van wankel beleid en constant veranderende inzichten en adviezen - vraagt u maar eens aan Maurice de Hond - heeft het er alle schijn van dat, uitgaand van goede wil, de autoriteiten eigenlijk helemaal niet zo goed weten waar zij mee bezig zijn. Sven bespreekt de rammelende argumentatie aan de hand van een casus uit de eigen praktijk.

    Links:
    Scheermes van Hanlon: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheermes_van_Hanlon
    Het immuunsysteem onder vuur: in gesprek met dr. Robert Gorter
    Gesprek 1: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2021/05/12/het-immuunsysteem-onder-vuur-in-gesprek-met-dr-robert-gorter-1-3-25/
    Gesprek 2: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2021/05/14/het-immuunsysteem-onder-vuur-in-gesprek-met-dr-robert-gorter-2-3-26/
    Gesprek 3: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2021/05/16/het-immuunsysteem-onder-vuur-in-gesprek-met-dr-robert-gorter-3-3-27/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Het immuunsysteem onder vuur: in gesprek met dr. Robert Gorter (3) | #3.27 (Aankondiging)

    In dit derde gesprek met dr. Robert Gorter neemt Sven Hulleman de veelbesproken PCR-test met hem onder de loep. Hoe werkt deze precies, welke haken en ogen zitten daaraan en welke implicaties heeft dit voor de samenleving en het beleid wat eraan wordt opgehangen?

    Dit derde deel van de eerste serie van drie gesprekken met Dr. Gorter is, net als de eerste twee, te zien op onze website: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2021/05/16/het-immuunsysteem-onder-vuur-in-gesprek-met-dr-robert-gorter-3-3-27/

    Het immuunsysteem onder vuur: in gesprek met dr. Robert Gorter (2) | #3.26 (Aankondiging)

    In dit tweede gesprek met dr. Robert Gorter, specialist in de immunologie, gaat hij verder in op de werking van het immuunsysteem en hoe dit reageert op virale infecties. Ook worden vaccins besproken, waarbij dr. Gorter waarschuwt voor de mogelijkheid van overreacties van het immuunsysteem wanneer mensen die al op natuurlijke wijze antilichamen hebben opgebouwd tegen het coronavirus worden ingeënt.

    U kunt het volledige gesprek hier bekijken: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2021/05/14/het-immuunsysteem-onder-vuur-in-gesprek-met-dr-robert-gorter-2-3-26/

    Het immuunsysteem onder vuur: in gesprek met dr. Robert Gorter (1) | #3.25 (Aankondiging)

    Er is nog altijd veel discussie over het coronabeleid van de overheid, zowel in Nederland als in de rest van de wereld. Voor elke mening bestaat wel een statistiek en elke bubbel lijkt zo overtuigd van het eigen gelijk dat er voorlopig nog geen einde aan de polarisatie lijkt te komen. Discussie over de medische kant van het verhaal wordt echter al van het begin af aan direct en vakkundig in de kiem gesmoord, waarbij de enkele medische professional die zich durfde uit te spreken zo door het slijk werd gehaald dat vakgenoten wel twee keer nadachten voordat zij nog een mening durfden te ventileren.

    Dat wil echter niet zeggen dat zij niet bestaan of dat zij de moed hebben opgegeven nog altijd zijn er medisch specialisten die de nek uitsteken om de fouten en misstanden in de bestrijding van het coronavirus aan de kaak te stellen. Zo ook dr. Robert Gorter, met wie Sven in contact is gekomen door het immuniteitsonderzoek dat hij onlangs mede-organiseerde in Baarn. Dr. Gorter wilde zijn kennis en inzichten als specialist met jaren van onderzoekservaring graag delen in een korte serie van gesprekken om enkele van de vele misvattingen die heersen over het onderwerp de wereld uit te helpen.

    Omdat dit onderwerp echter met keiharde censuur te maken krijgt op YouTube ziet u hier slechts een aankondiging voor het volledige gesprek kunt u terecht op eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl: https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/2021/05/12/het-immuunsysteem-onder-vuur-in-gesprek-met-dr-robert-gorter-1-3-25/

    Studio ingericht met dank aan: https://cd-rek.nl/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Overheidszaken en de stand van zaken (met Jordy Zwarts) | #3.24

    Jordy Zwarts van de Nationale Bond tegen Overheidszaken is inmiddels wel een vaste gast te noemen. Hij keert terug om zowel Sven als zijn kijkers en luisteraars op de hoogte te brengen van de huidige stand van zaken wat betreft de verschillende acties die de Bond is opgestart. Van een aangifte tegen Rutte c.s. en Stemmen Onder Voorwaarden tot de 5G- en coronarechtszaken Jordy zit niet stil en Sven neemt alle onconventionele plannen waarmee hij het rechtssysteem onder handen wil nemen nog eens met hem onder de loep.

    Een overzicht van alle acties van de Nationale Bond tegen Overheidszaken waarbij u zich nog kunt aansluiten vindt u hier: https://bondoverheidszaken.nl/actiepagina.html

    Studio ingericht met dank aan: https://cd-rek.nl/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Leve het leven | #3.23

    Veruit de meeste podcasts en video's die wij uitbrengen gaan over misstanden en andere zware onderwerpen. De enige reden om met zulke onderwerpen bezig te zijn is natuurlijk dat men een betere wereld wil, voor henzelf en voor hun dierbaren een betere wereld die niet vanzelfsprekend is maar de moeite waard om voor te vechten. Vandaag herinnert Sven u graag eens aan die andere zijde van de medaille, die het allemaal de moeite waard maakt.

    Link:
    Link Between the Huns and Vizsla Dogs Unravels an Ancient Enigma: https://www.ancient-origins.net/history-ancient-traditions/vizsla-0013289

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Vind houvast in wat je hebt: in gesprek met Mart Krijger | #3.22

    Trouwe kijkers hebben hem al eens eerder voorbij zien komen: kunstenaar Mart Krijger, zelf óók trouw kijker en bovendien de man achter het ontwerp van de schildpad en de vijf elementen die wij inmiddels alweer enige tijd als logo mogen gebruiken.

    Sven nodigde hem uit voor een gesprek ter gelegenheid van het boek 'Onvoorzien Verbonden' dat hij heeft uitgegeven, waarin verschillende bekende en minder bekende bekenden aan het woord komen over de coronacrisis. Bij Sven op de bank vertelt Mart openhartig over wat hem drijft én wat hem op de been houdt.

    'Onvoorzien Verbonden' is te bestellen in de webshop op nooit.nl: https://nooit.nl/shop/

    Als u geïnteresseerd bent in het werk van Mart Krijger:
    https://www.instagram.com/interior_gfm_decorations/
    https://www.instagram.com/skull_art_the_original/
    https://www.gfm-decorations.nl/
    0652684112
    [email protected]
    Bezoek studio mogelijk na tel. afspraak.

    Studio ingericht met dank aan: https://cd-rek.nl/

    Als u ons in deze turbulente tijden wilt helpen om dit te kunnen blijven doen en meer tijd en middelen te kunnen besteden aan onderzoek, interviews, reportages en andere zaken die er echt toe doen, overweegt u dan een bijdrage te leveren naar waardering én vermogen. Bezoek de webshop op https://nooit.nl/shop/ of ga naar https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl/steundeverbinding/

    Naast YouTube zijn wij uiteraard op meer kanalen te vinden. Voor een overzicht van onze eerdere publicaties en waar deze te vinden zijn, kijk op https://eenoorlogreedsverloren.nl

    Geen druppel verspild | #3.21

    De vaccins tegen het coronavirus zijn nog altijd een veelbesproken onderwerp waarover de meningen wereldwijd ernstig verdeeld zijn. Daar bovenop staat ook de vaccinatiestrategie ter discussie en in Nederland leveren zij die wél vertrouwen hebben in de vaccins zelf hierom felle kritiek op het kabinet, minister van Volksgezondheid, Welzijn en Sport Hugo de Jonge in het bijzonder.

    Een naamgenoot van de minister, huisarts de Jonge uit Zwolle, haalde onlangs zelfs het nieuws omdat hij tegen de adviezen in blijft vaccineren met AstraZeneca, het vaccin dat in opspraak raakte vanwege de verhoogde kans die het bleek te geven op trombose volgens de eerste cijfers. Er was wel meer dat opviel aan dat nieuwsbericht, genoeg in elk geval voor Sven om er een aantal vragen aan over te hebben gehouden.


    Watch the video: Enigma


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